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Thread: gas pipe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Default gas pipe

    hi i have 3/4in black gas pipe i want to remove from the basement from the in-wall oven up stairs in the kitchen , now some areas are screwed in with corner elbows with no nut so i can i get these off just twist them out?? an 2nd how do i know if the gas is out of the pipe after the valves been closed

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    24

    Default Re: gas pipe

    if you need to ask, especially when it comes to gas hire a professionall. i am a licsenced plumber in ohio and gas questions are the only thing i will not answer if some one asks me how to do it or what to do. there is too much liability to take any chances you are better off to leave it to someone that is insured

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Default Re: gas pipe

    make a mistake and go BOOM!
    Process of elimination. Good luck.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: gas pipe

    Yes, working with gas pipes is very risky, and if you never worked with gas pipes, I will suggest hiring a pro.
    But for your information, once the main valve at the gas meter is shut off, no new gas is flowing into the house pipes. If you disconnect the oven from the gas line, and turn the shut off valve before the oven on, of course the gas in the lines will escape out. Here in CA natural gas has a recognized odor, so you can make no mistakes about it. All windows must be open and there is no fire anywhere (cooktop or other). Once the pipe to the oven is removed, the main pipe system must be plugged and tested for leaks, using a gas pressure gauge.
    BTW, what do you mean by "nut"? if you mean a union, it's not allowed on gas lines.
    Again, for your safety, get a lic. contractor.
    Last edited by dj1; 01-25-2011 at 09:34 AM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: gas pipe

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    Yes, working with gas pipes is very risky, and if you never worked with gas pipes, I will suggest hiring a pro.
    But for your information, once the main valve at the gas meter is shut off, no new gas is flowing into the house pipes. If you disconnect the oven from the gas line, and turn the shut off valve before the oven on, of course the gas in the lines will escape out. Here in CA natural gas has a recognized odor, so you can make no mistakes about it. All windows must be open and there is no fire anywhere (cooktop or other). Once the pipe to the oven is removed, the main pipe system must be plugged and tested for leaks, using a gas pressure gauge.
    BTW, what do you mean by "nut"? if you mean a union, it's not allowed on gas lines.
    Again, for your safety, get a lic. contractor.
    With out a union of some type there would be no way you could hook up any appliance. When making the last connection to the stove are you going to spin the stove onto the pipe?

    John

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Default Re: gas pipe

    In some areas, unions may be permitted on gas pipes IF the union is in an exposed location.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    40

    Default Re: gas pipe

    you could use a gas flexline from shut off to fixture and unions in accessible locations in ca.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: gas pipe

    John, good question!
    In CA every appliance and end user is connected to its shut off valve with a flex (protection against quakes). But if you are making changes to gas lines in attics or crawl spaces (unexposed areas, thanks guys) you will need to use a left hand nipple and coupling. Not a union. This way, you don't have to spin an oven or worse, a water heater, onto the line (something even ARNOLD couldn't do)...and of course you will need to finish with a pressure test.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: gas pipe

    Quote Originally Posted by dj1 View Post
    John, good question!
    In CA every appliance and end user is connected to its shut off valve with a flex (protection against quakes). But if you are making changes to gas lines in attics or crawl spaces (unexposed areas, thanks guys) you will need to use a left hand nipple and coupling. Not a union. This way, you don't have to spin an oven or worse, a water heater, onto the line (something even ARNOLD couldn't do)...and of course you will need to finish with a pressure test.
    We have been using approved flex connectors for some time but as far as a left hand nipple and coupling, I didn't even know such a thing existed. And I have been in the plumbing business for over 50 yrs. Thanks for the info dj1. Even this old man can learn something new. Thanks again.

    John

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