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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5

    Default Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

    What would you replace galvanized iron pipes with? I had a leak in bathroom. I turned off the shut off valve but it leaked. So I had to turn off the water in the whole house. I bought a new valve and brass connectors. I am about to either purchase new iron pipes or something else. I will ask the hardware store what he recommends.

    I opened plaster behind flushometer and found:

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    Then I hacksawed the pipe next to connector and removed the rest of pipe by unscrewing it.

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    I am wondering whether I should use brass pipes or copper pipes or plastic pipes.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Needham, MA
    Posts
    559

    Default Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

    depending on your availability of tools, my number 1 choice would be pex. they make copper fittings that will screw into the existing galvi pipe then it's pex from there on, ony problem is that it's not cost effective to purchase the crimping tools. however, i plumbed my entire house with pex, water supply to every fixture in the house in about 6-8 hours. the second choice would be copper, same as above, they make fittings that will go into galvi then it's soddering the connections to your fixtures and the soddering equipment you need to do so would be less than $75 as opposed to several hundred for the pex tool set. if i did my entire house in copper, i would have been looking at at least 2 days minimum. definitely don't go with galvi, it's just a new problem waiting to happen.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

    I agree with the above. I had a siimiliar situation in my bahtroom and ended up ripping everything out. Go back as far as you can to get as much galv. out. You probably could see all the rust build up. Go at it and good luck!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,565

    Default Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

    When you go to join the old pipes to the new pipes, I recommend running a threading die on the existing pipe to clean up the threads. If you do this, you're less likely to have a leak at that joint.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5

    Default How do you connect copper to threaded pipes?

    Could anyone tell me how to connect copper pipe to the threaded pipes I already have? I need more specifics on what I need to purchase and how to put it together. Thanks for input.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,773

    Default Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

    It's called a NPT to copper adapter
    You'll need to know the size of the pipe and the size of the copper you are going to use.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

    when you join the copper to the galvanized pipe, whether you end up using pex or copper make sure you use a dielectric union. attaching copper straight to galvanized will produce an electrical reaction that will corrode the connection and cause failure over time. the are available at any hardware store and are absolutely essential for joining two dissimilar metals like copper and galvanized.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,565

    Default Re: Replace Galvanized Iron Pipes

    I'm in agreement with hippified.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Joining Copper and Gal Iron Pipes

    I joined the gal iron pipe to a brass valve and the copper pipe to the other end. Would you still consider it necessary to put a dielectric from the gal iron to the brass valve.
    If I had joined the gal iron to copper I would certainly agree to use a dielectric which I already purchased, but I thought it did not matter if I put brass in-between the two pipes.
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    What do you think?
    Moreover, I am thinking of replacing the branch pipe (gal iron) leading to the basement main distribution pipe because the branch pipe is corroded and will break in time. I am waiting until I have enough funds to do something about it. But I am thinking of somehow cutting it out piece by piece if need be to remove it from wall. Then I can put a copper pipe 1" in corner going down to basement and joining that with a dielectric to the gal iron pipe in basement.
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    I would welcome any suggestions or criticism of my intended project.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,565

    Default Re: Joining Copper and Gal Iron Pipes

    Quote Originally Posted by househelper View Post
    I joined the gal iron pipe to a brass valve and the copper pipe to the other end. Would you still consider it necessary to put a dielectric from the gal iron to the brass valve.
    If I had joined the gal iron to copper I would certainly agree to use a dielectric which I already purchased, but I thought it did not matter if I put brass in-between the two pipes.
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    What do you think?
    You still need a dielectric union. You need to break the electrical connection between the copper and the galvanized.

    "Waitaminit, what do you mean electrical, this is plumbing" you ask? When you have dissimilar metals such as zinc* and copper in an acid or alkaline solution, there is a voltage potential between them. In effect, you have created a battery. If there is an electrically conductive path between the two metals, there will be an electrical current flowing from one metal to the other through the conductor, in this case your brass valve. Over time, one of the metals will be dissolved and deposited onto the other metal through the water in a process called electrolysis. Eventually, the metal that is being dissolved will develop a leak. *Zinc being the coating on galvanized steel pipe

    If the water has a neutral pH (pH=7), you shouldn't experience any electrolysis. However, most water supplies will be slightly acidic or slightly alkaline. Extremely acidic or alkaline water supplies will be even more susceptible to electrolysis.

    The dielectric union contains a plastic bushing that effectively breaks the electrical connection.

    Moreover, I am thinking of replacing the branch pipe (gal iron) leading to the basement main distribution pipe because the branch pipe is corroded and will break in time. I am waiting until I have enough funds to do something about it. But I am thinking of somehow cutting it out piece by piece if need be to remove it from wall. Then I can put a copper pipe 1" in corner going down to basement and joining that with a dielectric to the gal iron pipe in basement.
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    I would welcome any suggestions or criticism of my intended project.
    A reciprocating saw (aka "Sawzall") fitted with a metal-cutting blade makes quick work of removing galvanized pipe.

    Use a spray bottle (like Windex comes in) to spritz water on wood framing where you will be soldering, to reduce the risk of fire. Old wood is often very dry and can catch fire easily. Keep a fire extinguisher handy, and monitor the area for a while after you're done.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

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