+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Small Eat-In Kitchen Design

    I really like the small kitchen galleries but I find that they rarely show the entire kitchen and the placement of all the appliances. I am hoping that TOH could add a few small kitchen remodels that show the entire kitchen layout.

    I would really appreciate looking at other small kitchen designs that anyone might know of.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Small Eat-In Kitchen Design

    We have a teeny, tiny kitchen that we just started remodeling. Problem: we're a busy family of four! So it's been a challenge. We decided to open up a wall on one of the sides and add a butcherblock countertop. This is where the kids now sit and eat.

    If you are interested, here is a blog I started with the before and after pictures: fiftieskitchenredo.blogspot.com.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,381

    Default Re: Small Eat-In Kitchen Design

    The best small kitchen design I have ever seen was in a magazine article back in the 70's. It was based on a diner. In fact most of the kitchen was made from salvaged material from an old diner.

    It was U shaped with a eating counter facing the dining area. The stove and refrigerator were on the exterior wall. That made venting the stove easier. The counter had three levels, the eating level with the bar stools, a higher level, about a foot higher and about 6" wide that held all the condiments and miscellaneous stuff and it also served to hid the sink and counter on the kitchen side. The dishwasher was next to the sink so clean up was easy, just pass the dishes over the counter.

    The dining area had a booth from the old diner as well. The homeowner claimed they fed a Thanksgiving dinner to 13 family members in that tiny space and no one felt cramped. The kitchen was only about 8' x 14'. The dining area wasn't much bigger, if at all, but the dimensions for it weren't given.
    Last edited by keith3267; 01-20-2012 at 01:19 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,096

    Default Re: Small Eat-In Kitchen Design

    When you can't create the space you need, you have to be creative with the space you've got. I once lived in 248 Sq Ft of living space comfortably, complete with a space-wasting bathtub in the bathroom. It worked because I never had more than a few people over at a time and I didn't waste any of my precious space when I designed and remodeled it.

    And here I am now, working on someone's 12,000 Sq Ft single family residence. Sorry, but we Americans waste more space than we will ever realize, and there's really nothing gained for doing it (but if you want me to I'll build it for you anyway )


    In Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, and similar places where space is at a high premium you find space-efficient ideas, and that's where I'd start looking for ideas. Sorry, but I don't know of any websites to recommend.

    Phil

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Small Eat-In Kitchen Design

    Thanks for this post! I like the pictures in the blog. Very helpful!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    140

    Default Re: Small Eat-In Kitchen Design

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastercarpentry View Post
    And here I am now, working on someone's 12,000 Sq Ft single family residence. Sorry, but we Americans waste more space than we will ever realize, and there's really nothing gained for doing it (but if you want me to I'll build it for you anyway )

    In Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, and similar places where space is at a high premium you find space-efficient ideas, and that's where I'd start looking for ideas. Sorry, but I don't know of any websites to recommend.

    Phil
    I believe your thinking should be the new normal, and it shouldn't be at war with personal choice (like large SUV's hauling 2 kids because the new-rich Mom doesn't look cool in a mini-van or smaller SUV).

    In Silicon Valley, the majority of houses are under 2,000 sf (2,000 sf will cost over $1 million), although their garages get filled with stuff so more cars are parked on driveways & street than indoors.

    Cool design is key -- our former house in Silicon Valley was 1,600 sf (1,800 expanded) and built by Eichler fr 1960-73 who used plans that were years ahead - open layout, efficient kitchens, outdoor-in concept (floor-to-ceiling glass expanse that was killed by 1970's building codes), a multi-purpose room (pre-dated family rooms), and depending on the model, soaring ceilings or center court atriums for 365-day plantings (made possible by California weather) and radiant heat -- the packaging was amazing, and cool design furniture would turn it into a magazine spread for not much money.

    Our former galley kitchen had double ovens (albeit 23" that we had to buy Miele, Gaggenau or 2 US units), and 42" Subzero, roll-out double trash bin and plenty of cabinet storage -- our wi-fi & compact network printer were in a small pantry. The cooktop counter (27" height) had a penninsular table end that seated 4, in front of a floor-to-ceiling glass wall next to the outside court garden atrium - all in a 18x7 footprint. At night, the glass wall would act as a mirror and reflect the kitchen, creating an illusion that the kitchen extended beyond the wall (as you see at restaurants).
    The kitchen, at the narrow end, opened to the dining room (through a pocket door), and the long end opened (via a bar-height counter-top) to a compact multi-purpose room where kids were supposed to do homework and adults watched TV, next to the person in the kitchen making meals.
    The flow was brilliant, the design compact & efficient, and the indoor-out glass walls (and sometimes soaring ceiling) made the space feel much larger. Flat screen TV's (35 years after 1970) would add to the space efficiency.

    Now I'm in 3,000sf in NoVa with immense heating & cooling bills, and my wife dragging me around the CIA, Pentagon and NIH corridor looking at furniture because there's 3,000 sf of space to fill.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •