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  1. #1
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    Jan 2011
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    Default getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    We have a cape style home, about 1400 sqft and was built in 1954.Our kitchen is always colder than the rest of the house. Our tempature in our living room would be 70 while the kitchen will be at 64, and they are right next to each other. I was thinking of adding a another duct into the kitchen but i am unable to as we have a stairwell for the basement in the way. There is currently only one duct with a 4" pipe coming off the main trunk. The kitchen as two windows and one man door. Two walls our exterior walls and there is attic space above the kitchen. (which i just insulated thinking it would help)

  2. #2
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    Jul 2009
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    Smile Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    I don't know the size of your kitchen but changing the four inch to a six inch run should help. Replace the takeoff at the Main Trunk, the run, and the boot, all from four to six. Make sure the takeoff has a damper in it. Don't forget to tape, seal and, insulate all.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2011
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    Default Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    Yea i thought about changing it to a 6", one other question though, all my vents are in the wall, so would i need to change the part that goes up from the floor into the wall as well. it is not even 12" off of the floor.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    You could also try a duct booster fan. The problem is wiring it in; ideally you'd have it come on the same time as the furnace blower.

    How to hook into the blower? I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    You could also try a duct booster fan. The problem is wiring it in; ideally you'd have it come on the same time as the furnace blower.

    How to hook into the blower? I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

    Yep Fence post is right, you could use a Booster, it could be wired right into the Blower, but if you've not done electrical I'd leave that part for an Electrician

  6. #6
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    Jan 2011
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    9

    Default Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    You could also try a duct booster fan. The problem is wiring it in; ideally you'd have it come on the same time as the furnace blower.

    How to hook into the blower? I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.
    Not sure how well a duct booster would work though, it is not that long of a run from the main truck to the vent maybe 12' with one 45 deg turn, and that being the only vent!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    If the run to the kitchen is to close to the supply Plenum the velocity could be causing the air to go right past it. They have whats called an air scoop to catch the air going past the supply run, or you could make one yourself. If you buy one just looking at it will explain how it gets installed, good luck.

  8. #8
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    Jan 2011
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    Default Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sten View Post
    If the run to the kitchen is to close to the supply Plenum the velocity could be causing the air to go right past it. They have whats called an air scoop to catch the air going past the supply run, or you could make one yourself. If you buy one just looking at it will explain how it gets installed, good luck.
    There is only one vent on that run and it is at the end.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    Quote Originally Posted by paintman161 View Post
    There is only one vent on that run and it is at the end.


    Does it come right off the end of the main trunk??? If it does then thats part if not all of your problem, it should be back 18" from the end. Ductwork is designed to have pressure within, called static pressure, if it comes off the end you have little to no static pressure. Think of a garden hose with holes in the sides, with no cap on the end you have no pressure, if you cap the end there is pressure, air works the same way. If it's designed right and you have as much supply as you do return, a little more return won't hurt but less will, and it's a reducing duct system you should be OK. Length and no. of 90's should be considered. Ductwork is not Rocket Science but there is science involved, when I bought my house there was an addition, and the Ductwork was a nightmare. Instead of fixing it they just added electric heat to that end of the house, since fixing it I haven't had to use the electric and it's very comfortable. Good luck!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    9

    Default Re: getting additional heat into the kitchen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sten View Post
    Does it come right off the end of the main trunk??? If it does then thats part if not all of your problem, it should be back 18" from the end. Ductwork is designed to have pressure within, called static pressure, if it comes off the end you have little to no static pressure. Think of a garden hose with holes in the sides, with no cap on the end you have no pressure, if you cap the end there is pressure, air works the same way. If it's designed right and you have as much supply as you do return, a little more return won't hurt but less will, and it's a reducing duct system you should be OK. Length and no. of 90's should be considered. Ductwork is not Rocket Science but there is science involved, when I bought my house there was an addition, and the Ductwork was a nightmare. Instead of fixing it they just added electric heat to that end of the house, since fixing it I haven't had to use the electric and it's very comfortable. Good luck!!
    Yes i do have them come right off the end of the main trunk, actually i have two, one for the kitchen and one for the dining room! Only thing about going back 18" from the end i would need to add a 90 deg and then the 45 deg, should i keep it the 4" or increase the size to 6"? Kitchen size is about 12'x12'

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