+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default Why does drywall only have 2 tapered edges?

    Why does drywall only have 2 tapered edges? This makes no sense to me since its easier to tape and mud a tapered edge. I cannot find the answer to this from anyone or on the internet.

    Thank you,

    CP

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,053

    Default Re: Why does drywall only have 2 tapered edges?

    Because you will inevitably have a cut edge at some point, and taping a cut edge into a tapered joint is a real PITA!

    Another reason is the way that drywall is made.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Ladson,SC
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Why does drywall only have 2 tapered edges?

    Spruse is correct in it is the way it is made.
    Made on a conveyer belt and is cut to the correct length 8-9-10 0r 12 feet. also will cut special order lengths.In manufacturing the starting lenght on the belt may be up to 700 feet before being cut.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Why does drywall only have 2 tapered edges?

    both valid points, special order drywall can also be 4'6 wide or 5', and lenghts of 14, 16, 18, ive heard of 20 ft but anything over that just isnt practical.. its too heavy to carry and too much chance of breaking not to mention deliver to a site
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Why does drywall only have 2 tapered edges?

    Thank you everyone for your replies!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,174

    Default Re: Why does drywall only have 2 tapered edges?

    Hi,
    this q brings to mind the old Fine Homebuilding trick of having wallboards terminate between studs (not on studs, as normal practice dictates), where special blocking would be set below the surface of the stud wall plane 1/4" to bow the butt ends of the rock down, in effect giving you completely flush seams on all four edges. People have done it, myself not among them. It's very fiddly, but it has been proven to work and with a 16" knife you can achieve perfectly flat wall planes. Probably best suited for high-gloss wall finishes, where even the best floated seams would be detectable simply because they have to stand out and have mud beyond the face of the paper.
    Casey
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •