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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    45

    Default How to rough in under cabinet lighting

    I am redoing my kitchen and need to figure out how to rough in my under cabinet lighting. I am not sure how a permanent system is designed. I live in a town that requires BX wiring (the wire that is wrapped with metal flex tubing) Anyway I donít want to install outlets for each lighting system so where do I run the exposed wire to? I believe I will use the small puck lighting.

    I will have room above my cabinets to install a junction box, does this help?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    179

    Default Re: How to rough in under cabinet lighting

    I believe BX was discontinued in the sixties.
    If you do not like AC armored cable (the equivalent of BX), you can use something like Wiremold metallic raceway underneath the cabinets, but the lights must be approved for hardwiring. http://www.americanlighting.com/products.cfm?ID=14 I do not know if non-metallic raceway is approved for those halogen fixtures.

    Xenon is cooler and more efficient than Halogen. LED's are much cooler and more energy efficient than Xenon, but cannot be dimmed. The low voltage lights require poweer supplies, but the supplies are available in hard wired models. The low voltage wiring between the lights and the poweer supply is not required to be in armored cable. Most cabinets have a valence (skirting) that will hide the lights, supply, and wire. I would mount the supply with the poweer inlet against the wall where the AC cable comes through, and the AC cable would not be visible. They will need GFI protection at the breaker or somewhere upstream on that circuit.

    I prefer American Lighting for undercabinet lights and Lowes can order any of their products.
    Last edited by ZZZ; 12-15-2010 at 10:55 AM.
    "Lead by Example"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    45

    Default Re: How to rough in under cabinet lighting

    Good advice, thanks!

    One more random question, is there an issue with having 2 GFCI's on the same circuit if they are split and not run in parell?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    179

    Default Re: How to rough in under cabinet lighting

    You can have every outlet on a circuit contain a GFI receptacle, although it would cost less to use a GFI breaker. You might have nuisance trips if you have the Load side of a GFI recptacle feeding another GFI, or if you have a GFI recpt. on a circuit that is already protected by a GFI breaker; plus, it is unnecessary to do this if the circuit is already GFI protected.

    Many older homes with no equipment grounding wire have been converted to GFI receptacles to give the occupants three wire receptacles even though there is no ground wire.

    This is legal as long as each GFI receptacle is labeled "No equipment ground"
    as per the NEC 406.3(D)(3)(b).
    If you are using a GFI breaker or upstream GFI recpt. to convert all the old ungrounded receptacles on a circuit to standard (not GFI) 3 wire types, you must also label each standard receptacle as above, plus "GFI Protected"
    as per the NEC 406.3(D)(3)(c)
    Last edited by ZZZ; 12-15-2010 at 10:59 AM.
    "Lead by Example"

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