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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    5

    Default Replacing high bulbs

    Hi Folks,

    I have some hanging lights that are about 12-15 feet high. I'm planning on using some light-changing pole extensions to do the job, such as these: http://www.amazon.com/Bayco-LBC-600C.../dp/B000256QZQ . However, since these lights are hanging by the cord, I also need something to grab the shade while I'm trying to unscrew the light (otherwise the lamp will just spin). However, the only gripper extensions I can find come with their own pole, and none are long enough (for example: http://www.amazon.com/Improving-Life.../dp/B002AJ6OFO).

    I'm wondering if anyone knows of a gripper that will just attach to a pole instead of coming with it's on pole? Or, alternatively, has a better idea for how to change my bulbs? I'm living in the dark these days! ;-)

    thanks,
    allie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,967

    Default Re: Replacing high bulbs

    An 8' ladder will get you to a reach height of 12' easily, even higher if you use the gripping devices you've described. A 10 or 12' ladder will get you to a 15' reach height without further aid.

    I recommend an A-frame fiberglass ladder over any other material or style, although the lightest weight ladder will be aluminum. I would also recommend testing the ladder in the store before purchase so you know how steady/sturdy it is and will be comfortable using it before taking it home. If you can't do heights, then I recommend hiring someone to come change the bulbs for you.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    159

    Default Re: Replacing high bulbs

    get a ladder, then you have one for future projects!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,577

    Default Re: Replacing high bulbs

    When you do manage to get the new bulbs in, do it with the switch on. Then, as soon as the bulb lights as you are screwing it in, give it about 1/8 turn more (and no more than that) and you shouldn't have trouble removing it next time. The contact in the center of the socket usually has enough springiness to make good contact without the bulb being tightened down.

    Overtightening a bulb can make it extremely difficult to remove, especially if the socket and bulb base are both made of aluminum.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,967

    Default Re: Replacing high bulbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    When you do manage to get the new bulbs in, do it with the switch on. Then, as soon as the bulb lights as you are screwing it in, give it about 1/8 turn more (and no more than that) and you shouldn't have trouble removing it next time. The contact in the center of the socket usually has enough springiness to make good contact without the bulb being tightened down.

    Overtightening a bulb can make it extremely difficult to remove, especially if the socket and bulb base are both made of aluminum.
    A tiny spot of WD-40 on the bulb threads will also keep them from seizing in the socket. And by tiny spot, I mean barely a drip, and smear it all the way around the threads.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Replacing high bulbs

    Since this is not a one-time thing (bulbs will keep burning out - usually when it is most inconvenient) you might consider replacing the fixture(s) with a model that pulls down. That way you bring the fixture down to you, replace the bulb, and push it back up into place.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: Replacing high bulbs

    I am still on the ladder idea. Like the man said, you have it for other projects and don't have the headache of finding a place to store the poles you only use for the one task. While you are up there, why not wipe the fixture off with a soft cloth and get rid of the dust too? Suggest the new energy conserving bulbs so the task doesn't need done as often.

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