+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    12

    Default Recessed lighting in bathroom: should it be covered or not?

    We just moved into a brand new home with highish ceilings (around 9-10 feet) with a proper vents installed in the bathrooms and the kitchen. My question is about the recessed lighting in the bathroom. Currently, it is not enclosed at the roof by a glass lens. There is so much condensation in the bathroom when we take a shower. I worry that the recessed lighting should be covered, with a glass dome so steam/condensation won't get into the roofing material and cause mold and other issues. Is this a legitimate concern?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Recessed lighting in bathroom: should it be covered or not?

    I would definitely get a bathroom cover for it. You're providing moisture directly to the light to begin with (obviously not good), and even easier access to the electrical than it needs to have. No recessed light is completely airtight, so you're also allowing, without any type of prevention, moisture into your attic/insulation.

    Get one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Recessed lighting in bathroom: should it be covered or not?

    Thanks. I solved this problem.

    It turns out that I have 6 inch Commercial electric recessed lighting, so I purchased a Commercial electric 6 inch lens (it is called a Poly Shower Trim, T13/T14, available at Home Depot). The details on the product are (Commercial Electric 6 in. Poly Shower Trim (12-Pack) Model # HBR70WH-12PK Internet # 202323820 Store SKU # 759305).

    Unfortunately, during the installation, I discovered that the recessed lighting fixture itself wasn't installed correctly and the cement/plaster around the circumference of the hole for the recessed light fixture is crumbling off. Any ideas what kind of plaster/cement I should use to mold the hole around the recessed lighting back to shape? Will regular plaster work?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Recessed lighting in bathroom: should it be covered or not?

    Unfortunately I don't. I removed as much as the plaster/old drywall as I could during my remodel. If I wasn't removing it, I was very careful about leaving what I could intact.

    You could use a dremel tool to cut out a nicely square size area to the midpoint of the trusses, replace the drywall, recut your light fixture hole, reinstall the light, and then redo the plaster in that area. No, "molding" of the hole. Just a suggestion.

    Another suggestion: just go up into your attic (assuming you have one) and spray foam around the light fixture to seal that gap. As long as the trim is covering the crumbling plaster I think it would work. Might even have the added benefit of the spray foam helping to secure some of the plaster from crumbling anymore.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,565

    Default Re: Recessed lighting in bathroom: should it be covered or not?

    I seem to recall that either building or electrical codes require recessed lights above a shower or bathtub be enclosed.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •