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  1. #1
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    Nov 2010
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    Question Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    Help! My husband installed a new hot water heater yesterday using pvc pipe and All Purpose PVC Cement and Purple Primer for PVC on the joints -- not only was the smell horrendous, but the smell is in our hot water when you turn on the faucet - 24 hours later. My common sense tells me this can't be healthy...the labels on the cans (which he doesn't read) say that long term exposure to these chemicals can cause "brain damage, liver and kidney damage, respiratory, reproduction damage", etc. etc. I don't think this toxic goop should be used on the inside of drinking water pipes. I don't even like pvc pipes for drinking water. My husband has been using it for 30 years and insists it's the only way he knows of -- Can this be true? Should we be using copper pipes for drinking water? Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    Most codes do not allow PCV to be used on water lines inside the home. It can be used on exterior water lines. It is also not rated for hot water. Are you sure it's PVC and not CPVC?

    John

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    Quote Originally Posted by johnjh2o View Post
    Most codes do not allow PCV to be used on water lines inside the home. It can be used on exterior water lines. It is also not rated for hot water. Are you sure it's PVC and not CPVC?

    John
    I was thinking the same thing.

    PVC is widely used for the distribution of potable water supply.

    Whether or not it's allowed to be used inside the home might be a grey area. Considering it has ASTM approval for potable water then it stands to reason as long as it meets all the proper ASTM spec's it should be able to be used inside the home for cold potable water distribution. Then and again I haven't worried about scouring the plumbing codes for use inside residential applications.

    However , PVC only has a maximum temperature range of around 140 degrees F which is why it's used for cold water and not hot water. Whereas CPVC has a maximum temperature range of around 210 degrees F which is allowed for both hot and cold water.

    Since you would need CPVC for hot water and PVC could be used for cold water --- wouldn't make sense to use 2 different materials, I can't recall seeing PVC used for potable water distribution in a residential application because of that --- and why I said it's a grey area

    If it were me and plastic needed to be be used I would have used PEX --- far less hassle than glueing rigid piping.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  4. #4
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    Nov 2010
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    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    Yes, turns out it was CPVC pipe that he used - but why the awful pvc cement smell and taste in the hot water? Can this be a good thing?? Is it really okay to use such toxic chemicals in water supply lines?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    Quote Originally Posted by Linda P View Post
    Help! My husband installed a new hot water heater yesterday using pvc pipe and All Purpose PVC Cement and Purple Primer for PVC on the joints -- not only was the smell horrendous, but the smell is in our hot water when you turn on the faucet - 24 hours later. My common sense tells me this can't be healthy...the labels on the cans (which he doesn't read) say that long term exposure to these chemicals can cause "brain damage, liver and kidney damage, respiratory, reproduction damage", etc. etc. I don't think this toxic goop should be used on the inside of drinking water pipes. I don't even like pvc pipes for drinking water. My husband has been using it for 30 years and insists it's the only way he knows of -- Can this be true? Should we be using copper pipes for drinking water? Thank you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Linda P View Post
    Yes, turns out it was CPVC pipe that he used - but why the awful pvc cement smell and taste in the hot water? Can this be a good thing?? Is it really okay to use such toxic chemicals in water supply lines?
    It is important to choose the correct solvent cement or pipe glue based on the type of plastic pipe being used.
    Specific solvent cement for rated CPVC must be used since it has the appropriate ASTM spec for safely using with potable water sources along with the correct formulation to chemically react to the CPVC.


    This particular solvent cement has low VOC's which will greatly reduce the smell associated with solvents.

    As long as the purple primer states it's rated for CPVC then it should be fine.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    Purple primer is not used with CPVC, it is used on PVC.

    John

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    john -- sure it can as long as it listed for CPVC.


    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    We use Flowguard CPVC pipe and fittings. No primer is required when using there cement. But I stand corrected that primer can be used on CPVC. You learn something new every day.

    John

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas
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    128

    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    Odor will leave with time. There should have been a 24 hour drying period before charging the line, but they usually hold well without the full time.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Safety of All Purpose PVC Cement

    Hi there, greetings from Peru. Hope you can help us some with this. Our kitchen faucet (hope it's the right term) was just replaced. Usually the only thing used for such job (besides a tool) is a white tape called "teflon" here around the faucet tube. But this time the person who did the job used PVC Cement (blue) which is weird. The faucet is made of metal and the "wall socket" is also metal, so why would he use pvc cement? worst of all, since the cement is not used against pvc I doubt if it will "dry" as it should and become "safe" for potable water transportation and servicing. What do you guys think?

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