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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    11

    Question Bamboo floors in slab-on-grade house, tounge & groove vs click lock

    My wife and I would like to put some new flooring in our house, and really like the look of bamboo. Our house is on a slab and is currently carpeted throughout, and we are wondering what our options are. At one point I thought I had read that, since all we have under the carpet is the concrete slab, that click lock flooring was our only option. After doing some searching ****** though, I've found some conflicting information. I'd like to get the opinion of people here as to whether click lock or typical tounge and groove flooring would be best for us in this situation. If it makes any difference, we'd be installing it in a large portion of the house, including our living room which is HUGE. I don't have the exact measurements with me at work, but it is a very large room. If one type would work better in our situation then we'd obviously choose that. If either would work equally well then we'd rather do whatever would be cheapest.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Coventry, RI
    Posts
    340

    Default Re: Bamboo floors in slab-on-grade house, tounge & groove vs click lock

    You do have the option of either a click lock or tongue and grove engineered floor. The tongue and grove engineered floor allows you to have a floating floor over a cushioned vapor barrier underpayment that is on the concrete slab. The tongue and groves are glued together as opposed to being click lock. Either way would work in your situation but in my opinion I would go with a tongue and grove engineered floor. It is made of plywood as opposed to pressed board that many click lock floors are made of. The click lock goes together faster but I think the engineered tongue and grove is a better way to go.

    Some may say that you could glue down tongue and groove directly to the concrete slab but I would say don't do that. This would not provide any moisture barrier between the slab and the wood floor, as well as if you ever want to change the flooring if and when bamboo goes out of fashion (I'm not saying it will but remember the orange and **** appliances that were all the rage in the 70's) it will be difficult to change if it is glued to the slab. Hope this helps you out.

    Mike

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