+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default Sshaped Landing at top of stairway

    I desperately need help with the installation of our S-shaped landing at the top of our staircase. All the other homes with this floorplan have iron spindles and feel very strong when testing the railing at the top landing. We put in wooden spindles and the landing doesn't feel safe at all. I have been told that we need to add either one or two posts in the middle to make it secure. I have also been told that it would not matter if we installed iron/metal or wooden spindles that this landing would still require additional posts in the middle.

    I feel this would completely change the aesthetics of the entry, as this is the first thing you see when you walk into the home. other landings I've seen do not have any posts interrupting the flow of the railing, even with the same scurve.

    I requested that they change it to metal, but they are now saying it would still require additional posts. None of the other homes with this floorplan have posts interrupting the flow and are very strong. Are they just trying to cut costs and add posts rather than change it to iron spindles? Can you PLEASE help advise me on this? I am desperate for answers. Thank you in advance!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	OurLanding.JPG 
Views:	32 
Size:	28.0 KB 
ID:	3743   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ModelLanding.JPG 
Views:	33 
Size:	34.4 KB 
ID:	3744  
    Last edited by Jenrivera; 10-17-2010 at 04:45 PM. Reason: picture

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,203

    Default Re: Sshaped Landing at top of stairway

    The easy way to incur more lateral stiffness is to add one or more intermediate newel posts. The only other way to incur more lateral stiffness is to place the rail system in compression. If the top rail is being pressed toward the floor, it will resist lateral movement. The device to add this compression would typically be sections of steel rod attached to framing at the bottom, and tightened with a nut on top. The nut can be hidden in a plugged hole in the rail. The rod could be hidden inside a bored-out balluster, but drilling through one that's 3 feet long requires special equipment, or a few spares.
    S_M
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Sshaped Landing at top of stairway

    Thank you, S_M.

    Also, when you push out against the current railing it moves more than I would like it to.

    The landings I've encountered with metal spindles and a wooden banister feel much stronger, more secure, and do not move when pushed against. Could this be remedied by changing to metal spindles?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    598

    Default Re: Sshaped Landing at top of stairway

    Jen, is the top Bannister rail the same width and thickness between the 2 different spindles. The picture with the metal spindles looks like the rail is wider & thicker...
    Gizmo

    Cut it 3 times & it's still to short.
    Inventor of the Miter Master Plus.

    Hidden Content
    Hidden Content

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •