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Thread: Drywall

  1. #1
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    Default Drywall

    After the drywall was installed, I had a contractor come in to to do the mudding, and painting. I now notice, after all the trim and cubbards,and flooring are installed,,, yellow-ish , vertical lines everywhere , where a stud is, and also see where all the sheet rock screws are,, some are indented,,, my question is ,, how can i repair this ,, i've was told , just painting over it would turn out the same ,, and others said that,, i would have to sand every where ,where a stud is ,and re-mud to do it right. This is a big job,,, and i need to know the right way to handle this and would appreciate the input !!!!! I hope nobody ever has to go through this,,this kind of re-work is a night-mare....
    One other note,, couple times during rocking, an ink pen was used to draw verticle lines for screws,,,, is this a mith, that that could be the reason for verticle lines,, ink bleeding through ?? but that wouldn't explain seeing every srew,,,Thanks for the help !!!!!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Drywall

    Sounds like there wasn't enough drywall compound or topping compound used to fill all the voids. If you're seeing every fastener, there are likely many seams that are equally hollow that will cause shadows and be apparent no matter how much paint is applied. As for being able to see yellow streaks and ink lines, then it is equally likely that no primer was used and both inexpensive paint and not enough paint was applied to adequately cover and hide.

    Patches are made on painted walls all the time without sanding off the paint first. You shouldn't have to sand anything before applying more topping compound to the fasteners. I'd also check for hollow seams and fill them as necessary. Once all that is done, if the walls are textured, I'd recommend floating the walls smooth and retexturing from scratch. The reason for this is that trying to blend in dozens of 3" dots on the wall will be next to impossible, add a couple seams to the dots and you'll have a terrible looking wall. By floating it smooth, you're starting with a clean slate and will be much happier with the end results.

    If the marks are indeed pen, they will continue to bleed through. Use a stain blocking primer such as Kilz or Zinnser 123, two good, even coats. Follow that with two good, even coats of a good quality paint, such as Kelly Moore or Sherwin Williams, two of many good brands.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
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    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    Default Re: Drywall

    Hunter,
    Sounds like you got a really mediocre drywall and paint job. I would agree with the advice Spruce has given. I question why you are seeing long yellow shading. Many pre-mixed drywall compounds are very yellow and stand out against the white of the drywall paper. It sounds like you might have just have a case of poor priming and painting which is still allowing the yellow color of the mudding to show through.
    I would make a test area by priming over a patch of this yellow area with a good primer (not just a drywall primer) followed by a coat of the finish paint. If the shading disappears, a re-prime and paint is in order. Of course, you should top off those low areas in the mudding before doing this general painting. If your finish color is a strong color, have your primer tinted close to the finish color.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Drywall

    If it's yellow strips rather than lines the mud was applied to thin and you are getting tape bleed through.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Drywall

    I appreciate the time you've taken to respond to this problem. One thing im not clear on, if the sheet rock was hung horizontal,what would explain the complete lines ,vertical ,from top to bottom. One other comment i'd like to make on the lines and screws showing is , i was also told that the wood wasnt kiln dried and the moister bled through ??? is this possible ? I don't know when this will start,,, i will check back to hear your responses and advice on how to tackle this. Thanks again for your help !!!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Drywall

    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter View Post
    if the sheet rock was hung horizontal,what would explain the complete lines ,vertical ,from top to bottom
    You will have vertical seams, regardless of the direction the drywall was hung. Wherever one sheet ends and another begins will create a vertical seam. If the top sheet aligns with the bottom sheet or the sheets are hung vertically, you're going to have floor to ceiling seams.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter View Post
    i was also told that the wood wasnt kiln dried and the moister bled through ??? is this possible ?
    Highly unlikely. Newly constructed homes are built with wet, green 2x4's, while they will generally dry out some before the drywall goes on, there is still plenty of moisture within the wood and it does not cause any problems with the drywall, what-so-ever. The problem you describe would seem to be cause by shoddy workmanship, not material issues.

    The way drywall works is that the surface of the wallboard is dented slightly when the fastener is installed. This gives a pocket for the drywall compound to fill and cover the fastener. The sides of a sheet of drywall are beveled for the same purpose, so that compound and tape may be installed without creating a lump. That's the technical on the installation. The proper finishing is to fill all the voids to be flush with the surface. This has to be done in layers because the drywall compound shrinks as it drys, so the first layer will fill the majority of the hole, but leave a divot when dry. A second layer of topping compound (as opposed to joint compound ) is applied to further fill the voids. Sometimes two coats is enough, though most often it requires three before voids and seams become invisible. I'm suspecting that your walls got one coat, maybe two, and the compound was applied frugally, so the voids were never filled completely, resulting in what you see now.

    You're probably wondering what the difference between joint compound and topping compound is. Joint compound dries harder and is harder to sand than topping compound, it's also not quite as smooth, so it's a little harder to work with for a good final finish. For the problems you describe, filling and skim coating with topping compound will be the way to go.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Drywall

    Spruce, thank you for the fast reply,,,You mentioned lines at joints ,where sheets but up, or join together,top and botom,,, i hope asking this again wont stop the help,,, The lines on the wall are not near any joints where sheets join together. There like ,on one wall, where two 12' sheets,hung horiz. , one seam in the middle,,,,, and every 16" on center ,a line , or yellowish shade,, at least 2" wide top to bottom. There everywhere , reguardless of where the seams are. Again, thanks for the help,,,,

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Drywall

    Ah, I think I see what you're describing now. The finisher probably used a production tool to apply the compound to the fasteners. This tool resembles a large squirt gun with a blade. The tool is set at the top of a column of fasteners and as the tool moves down the wall it applies and trowels the compound in one stroke, leaving behind the stripes that you are describing. The fact that you can see them at all has to do with the absence of primer and enough paint to adequately cover the wall. It also furthers my suspicion that only a single coat of compound was applied where two or more should have been used.

    And you're most welcome. I hope that our discussion has been helpful.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Drywall

    I believe spruce has gotten to the basic cause. and it may be lack of coats but I have a suspicion that it could also be that it wasn't sanded out very well.

    I say this because if it was sanded the line wouldn't be a distinct line but would be faded at the edges

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Drywall

    Thanks everyone for the replys,,,, Does anyone have a plan on how to repair all the shades , (lines),, (dots,everywhere a fastener is),. Its going to be a mess and i'd like to hear your input and ideas before i start.

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