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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Gaps in wood plank floor

    I live in a small 141-year-old house. Upstairs, the floors are wide wood planks with large gaps in between them, that range from 1/8" to 1/2" (even in the summer with no AC). There is subfloor beneath.

    Dust and dirt accumulate in these gaps, and it seems every time I drop an earring or something small, it seems to land in the gaps. Although I am tempted to just lay carpet and call it a day, I want to find something to fill the gaps.

    I'm thinking something flexible. Caulk? If so, what kind? Has anyone had luck successfully filling the gaps and what did you use?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Gaps in wood plank floor

    the best way to fix this is to use what would have been used in the old days, rope. Using a natural fiber rope soak it in an appropriate colored stain, let dry. then force the rope into the spaces between the floor boards, unraveling it as necessary to fit smaller cracks. The rope will allow the boards to expand and contract and prevent small items from falling through.

    Dave
    www.NewAgeHomeImprovement.org

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,620

    Default Re: Gaps in wood plank floor

    Yep, New Age's post describes the traditional way. Stay away from crack fillers they dry out, crack, break, and disintegrate. Caulking will not stand up to foot traffic.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    367

    Default Re: Gaps in wood plank floor

    Just about any modern filler that you use will degrade over time and look bad. It sounds like you have two choices. One is to pull up the floor boards and re-lay them. The next is to buy some kneepads, some rope, and some stain.

    If it were me, I'd pull the boards up and re-lay them and get a better job of it.

    Good Luck.

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