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  1. #1
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    Dec 2008
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    Default granite counter top removal

    I would like to install new cabinets in my kitchen. How do I remove the existing granite counter tops, remove the old cabinets and install the new, and re-install the counter tops properly?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: granite counter top removal

    it will be well worth it to have a granite company to come in and do the removal and reinstall of the granite. this will put the liability on them, but it also can require special tools especially if you have any seams in the tops. to take it apart at the seams you use a pair of heat strips which soften the epoxy but special care has to be given to the splashes and super special care around any cutouts.

    if determined to do it yourself please post again and I will give you the best advice I can.
    wishing you the best

  3. #3
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    Dec 2008
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    Default Re: granite counter top removal

    Thanks so much for your reply. At this point, I think I can do it myself. There are no seams. Just the sink hole, which is in the middle of a 62" run. The second piece, 74" long, has no seams or holes. The third piece is small, maybe 24", on top of just one base cabinet.
    I figure I can brace it, and cut out the base cabinets with a sawzall. Remove the stone, leaving the very top part of base cab's still attached to the underside, and lean it length-wise against a wall. Then, use heat and a stiff putty knife to dig and sc**** off the epoxy where the wood is still attached.
    Does this make sense? Thanks again for your help! :-)
    Steve

  4. #4
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    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: granite counter top removal

    first is backsplash removal (if you have granite back splashes) first cut away all caulk where splash meets wall and where splash meets top. second take a drywall knive and slide it between the wall and the splash starting on one end and working to the other, resist the urge to pry on the splash as you work your way down it will break easily. keeping the splash in an upright position (the same as it was sitting on the top) pick it up and move it to a safe location. do not lay it down. keep it in an upright position. (same position as it was sitting on the top)

    top removal---tops may be caulked down or they may have used epoxy. lets hope caulk. first remove sink out of top if it is top mount or an under mount it should have fasteners on the underside, but should also be caulked where top meets sink, use a long knive to cut caulk after fasteners have been loosened. then remove sink.

    before trying to remove top (sink top) take two 2x4 ones that are longer then the top and taking bar clams clamp one to the top along the back wall and one at the front, you can clamp at the ends and at both sides of the sink cut out. so it would be a total of 8 bar clamps. slide the top forward never try to pick it straight up it will break at the sink cutout. silde it about one third off the cabinet then stand it up on its back side. then one strong man at each end of the top pick it up and put it in a safe leaning or clamped in an up right position with your finished edge up.

    if not clear in some way post again and let me know area of concern.


    wishing you the best

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Default Re: granite counter top removal

    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusFarcus View Post
    I think you'd be better off skipping the putty knife and using a razor knife with the longer snap blades some wedges and a wire saw so you don't snap or crack the slab. I would be leary of using heat as you'll likely crack the slab or cause it to flake if you're using a heat source high enough to effect the epoxy the stone stays cold.

    Better yet would be to get a fabricator or installer to remove it for you they'd have the vacuum cups to use for lifting each one handles over a hundred pounds they can place them all over and with a half dozen dudes and some poles between the handles you should be able to cut the epoxy bond lift the slab and slide it to a cart dolly.

    If the cabinets are toast there are chemical epoxy removers that break the bonds.
    #1 if it is epoxy you aren't going to cut it.
    #2 do you have any idea how hot it would have to get to crack or flake? it would take a person holding mapp gas in one place for several minutes and then maybe it might crack if the rest of the slap were iced.
    #3a half dozen dudes??? that piece of granite would weigh around one hundred and fifty pounds, you put that many guys on one piece of granite with a sink and it is to easy to break because of to many hands on a piece. all it takes is one guy next to the cut out to lift a little higher or one guy to turn and not the others. 150 divided by 6 comes out to 25 lbs apiece, if thats all they can carry then they are in the wrong trade.

  6. #6
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    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: granite counter top removal

    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusFarcus View Post
    Dude get over yourself!

    150 pounds? even 3/4" (would need underlayment for slab this big but so thin) would weigh more than that!

    Go with the minimum before you start spewing your venom and check your math Dude!

    74" long run countertop no holes or seams
    26" deep
    That's approximately 13.4 square feet of granite.
    30mm (1-1/4") thick thats average 18 - 20 lbs per square foot.
    That's a slab 240 to 267 pounds not 150 pounds. A Thicker slab would weigh more. Overhangs or larger slab weighs more.

    Reaching and lifting already epoxied to cabinets plus the weight of the cut cabinet material.

    Who said he was using professional dudes to remove it - he said he was doing the removal and reinstallation himself by first cutting through the cabinet carcasses!

    You don't need mapp Gas and ice to flake or crack a suspended granite slab.

    Check your attitude at the door. What's up with your Galactically Stupid Club - Rude Dude!
    ok to do the math the smaller top is 62 inches multiply this by 25 inches deep and you have is 1550 square inches or 10.76 square feet and at 22.5 pounds per square feet you have242.28 pounds but since this has a sink cut out that would be approx 98 lbs which would leave a remainder of 144 lbs.

    I own a granite company and that is where my experience comes from. not guessing or google or things I saw on discovery channel.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2007
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    Default Re: granite counter top removal

    also in the granite business they don't go by american standard measurements but metric so it wouldn't be 3\4 it would be 2 C.M. and that would be 15 lbs per square foot so that would come out to 98.95

  8. #8
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    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: granite counter top removal

    I don't surf the net, I hardly ever use google, and I don't have time for the discovery channel. I'm a business owner. I own and operate a granite countertop business. the problems discussed on this thread are daily issues that I deal with.
    2 c.m. granite is used every day on many projects and is used without any kind of underlayment. once installed as long as it is installed correctly is very strong.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    1,131

    Default Re: granite counter top removal

    'Man who say it cannot be done should not interrupt man doing it' ~ Chinese proverb

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