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  1. #51
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    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    I estimate it would cost $856.47 per sq. ft. to build a house according to her interpretation of and rewritten building code.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  2. #52
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    I estimate it would cost $856.47 per sq. ft. to build a house according to her interpretation of and rewritten building code.
    Jack
    That's okay. 200 sq. ft. houses are better for the environment.

  3. #53
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    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by ****hiller View Post
    Yes.......and unless I'm mistaken........that's aluminum duct you have there in direct contact with concrete. Have you no shame??
    Oh ... you know me ... a rebel showing complete disrespect for the rules.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  4. #54
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    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Jack .... just think of how safe and long lasting that home would be using BRP SPECS.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  5. #55
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    Jan 2009
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    8

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    ***!!!!!

    Who ever would have thought a simple question about cold air infiltration would result in such a response

    Thanks to all that posted constructive suggestions to my issue. I like the upright vent idea, however that would not help in insulating the ducting from the effects of cold thru the unheated crawlspace, but I will be installing one as it is sure to provide some help. Again thanks.

    And to assure those that may think my home is in imminent danger; the dryer vent duct is not plastic or foil, but rigid aluminum passing thru normal stick construction walls, no masonry involved.

    I apologise if this information sets off another similar discussion.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    731

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by BentNail View Post
    ***!!!!!
    Who ever would have thought a simple question about cold air infiltration would result in such a esponse
    Thanks to all that posted constructive suggestions to my issue. I like the upright vent idea, however that would not help in insulating the ducting from the effects of cold thru the unheated crawlspace, but I will be installing one as it is sure to provide some help. Again thanks.
    And to assure those that may think my home is in imminent danger; the dryer vent duct is not plastic or foil, but rigid aluminum passing thru normal stick construction walls, no masonry involved.
    I apologise if this information sets off another similar discussion.
    Dryer exhaust ducts.
    Exhaust ducts shall have a smooth interior finish and shall be constructed of metal a minimum of 0.16 inch (0.4mm) thick*.
    The exhaust duct size shall be 4 inches nominal in diameter.
    The exhaust duct shall be supported at 4 foot intervals and secured in place.
    The insert end of the duct shall extend into the adjoining duct or fitting in the direction of airflow.
    Ducts shall not be joined with screws or similar fasteners that protrude into the inside of the duct.
    Transition ducts used to connect the dryer to the exhaust duct system shall be a single length that is listed and labeled in accordance with UL 2158A.
    Transition ducts shall be a maximum of 8 feet in length. Transition ducts shall not be concealed within construction.
    *Penetrations through rated assemblies** shall be a minimum of 26 gage galvanized steel.

    **Your walls and the laundry room floor/crawl space "ceiling" assembly - structural and rated assembly:

    Exhaust penetrations. Where a clothes dryer exhaust penetrates a wall or ceiling membrane, the annular space shall be sealed with noncombustible material, approved fire caulking, or a noncombustible dryer exhaust duct wall receptacle. Ducts that exhaust clothes dryers shall not penetrate or be located within any fireblocking, draftstopping of any wall, floor/ceiling or other assembly required by the International Building Code to be fire-resistance rated, unless such duct is constructed of galvanized steel or aluminum of the thickness specified in Section 603.4 and the fire-resistance rating is maintained in accordance with the International Building Code. Fire dampers, combination fire/smoke dampers and any similar devices that will obstruct the exhaust flow, shall be prohibited in clothes dryers exhaust ducts.
    Best practices:
    1. The shafts and chases in which the duct is installed should be constructed, protected, and fire resistant rated as required by the shall conform to the International Building Code.
    2. Dampers shall be prohibited in the exhaust duct. Penetrations of the shaft and ductwork should be protected in accordance with Section 607.5.5, Exception 2.
    3. Rigid metal ductwork shall be installed within the shaft to convey the exhaust. The ductwork should be constructed of sheet STEEL having a minimum thickness of 0.0187 inches (0.471 mm) (No. 26 gage) and in accordance with SMACNA Duct Construction Stanards.
    4. The ductwork within the shaft should be designed and installed without offsets.
    5. A cleanout opening should be located at the base of any shaft to provide access to the duct to allow for cleaning and inspection. The finished opening should be not less than 12 inches by 12 inches.
    5. Screens shall not be installed at the termination.

    THINGS TO REMEMBER:

    14,000 fires a year involving/related to clothes dryers, clothes dryer exhaust ducts.
    Fire reports (make interesting reading) from the news:
    http://www.dryerbox.com/dryer_fire_articles.htm

    Clothes dryer exhaust ducts you have to compensate for increased pressure loss, trapping lint, and reaching dew point. Gas clothes driers must also follow the Gas codes not just the general clothes dryer rules - for example restrictions on locating in a bedroom or bath suite, unlike electric clothes dryers.

    Remember that the intent of the codes is to create a modified fire-rated separation. However, while there are many "equivalent" ducting materials capable of transmitting air, they may not have "equivalent flame and smoke rating" as used within the contents of the codes, the term "equivalent ducting" means a material equal in strength, combustibility, flame and smoke rating as 26 gage steel, regards to penetrations in the separations of the dwelling.

    Although an exception for dryer duct booster fans made a brief appearance in the 2003 ICC IRC, it was removed in 2006 for good reason. The exception required the clothes dryer manufacture's instructions allowing (none did) and required a listing for the purpose (none had - listings and tests were for fan only and none for the purpose of installing IN LINE in the clothes dryer exhaust duct itself).Despite certain mgf claiming a CSA approval and other testing lab (not UL) claiming passing a UL test, the tests were not for dryer duct use of a fan, thus the exception for residential Type 1 use of a fan was removed.

    Hope that helps you in your decision making process Bent Nail. As mentioned previously, I suspect you have other issues regarding pressure/air in your laundry area, regarding the cold wind in your dryer when not in use, considering the path you described for your dryer exhaust vent.

    I wouldn't rely on statement of another poster (with pictures) that such was "to code". screws in both sides of non-compliant elbow/offset fitting (not F to M wrong fitting!), unsupported and obviously more than 4 feet, colar connection too close to exterior penetration, styrofoam panel on exterior wall within inches of seam, seam separation at that location, and not mechanically secured (tape isn't enough for such - clamps, etc.). Thin gage through wall - no clearance from combustibles (near interior wall, near plywood shelf and electrical cable, etc. The copper pink appearance in one of the photos with elbow hints at having used range hood duct.
    Last edited by Blue RidgeParkway; 01-16-2009 at 10:16 AM.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    8

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue RidgeParkway View Post
    Hope that helps you in your decision making process Bent Nail.
    Thanks BRP, my decision has already been made.

    One other question. I'm new around here, this was my first thread; what does that 'Banned' symbol under your name mean?

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,617

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by BentNail View Post
    Thanks BRP, my decision has already been made.

    One other question. I'm new around here, this was my first thread; what does that 'Banned' symbol under your name mean?
    Banned means that this alias, one of many that this troublesome individual has, can no longer post on the forums.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  9. #59
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Banned

    Oh my ..... what a surprise.


    What's the tally ........

    LeslieK = banned

    DwarfWytch = banned

    unregistered = banned

    Yuk Yuk = banned

    Rayhemp = banned

    Blue RidgeParkway = banned

    next alias = soon to be banned.
    Last edited by canuk; 01-16-2009 at 08:58 PM.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  10. #60
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    Aug 2007
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    The Great White North
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    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue RidgeParkway View Post
    I wouldn't rely on statement of another poster (with pictures) that such was "to code". screws in both sides of non-compliant elbow/offset fitting (not F to M wrong fitting!), unsupported and obviously more than 4 feet, colar connection too close to exterior penetration, styrofoam panel on exterior wall within inches of seam, seam separation at that location, and not mechanically secured (tape isn't enough for such - clamps, etc.). Thin gage through wall - no clearance from combustibles (near interior wall, near plywood shelf and electrical cable, etc. The copper pink appearance in one of the photos with elbow hints at having used range hood duct.
    Not that it matters as far as responding to someone that is banned ..... but ... in typical fashion ......WRONG .

    No styrofoam at all.

    The copper pink appearance is simply the lighting.

    As for the rest of those points .... bunk.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

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