+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 60
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8

    Default Cold clothes dryer

    We have a gas fired clothes dryer that is vented to the outside. The venting is aluminum ducting. The vent begins in the wall behind the dryer, goes down into an unheated basement, across the ceiling to the outside wall and vents thru a flappered vent cap. The flapper works fine, the venting is not clogged. On cold days when the dryer door is opened it is like a refrigerator door opening. I have no doubt that the cold air is coming from the outside and the basement. Would indulsting the vent duct in the basment and adding another flapper at the start of the vent duct behind the dryer be of any help, or just a waste of time? Suggestions appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,836

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Most of those cheap dryer flappers don't seal very well when closed and even flap when the wind is blowing. You might consider getting a dryer vent with a powered flapper.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by BentNail View Post
    We have a gas fired clothes dryer that is vented to the outside. The venting is aluminum ducting. The vent begins in the wall behind the dryer, goes down into an unheated basement, across the ceiling to the outside wall and vents thru a flappered vent cap. The flapper works fine, the venting is not clogged. On cold days when the dryer door is opened it is like a refrigerator door opening. I have no doubt that the cold air is coming from the outside and the basement. Would indulsting the vent duct in the basment and adding another flapper at the start of the vent duct behind the dryer be of any help, or just a waste of time? Suggestions appreciated.
    ALUMINUM DUCT/VENT/FLUE for a gas fired clothes drier!!!! OH NO, NO, NO!!!

    "Chicken Little" (not really, its potentially a MAJOR problem!) Alert Bellow:

    DO NOT CONFUSE THE TRANSITION DUCT CONNECTOR WITH THE CLOTHES DRYER EXHAUST DUCT (SYSTEM).

    Never, EVER use thin (less than 26 ga.) aluminum duct/vent/flue for a gas clothes drier in a wall or through wall assembly or through or in a wall/ceiling assembly!!!!! The entirety of a clothes dryer exhaust duct should be smooth walled. Semi-rigid is only listed for use as a transition connection between the dryer itself and the exhaust duct. Aluminum foil/coiled/flexible is worse, and the only thing worse than that would be if you had one of those plastic spiral flexible expandable vent duct kits (which IMO should be against the law to even stock or sell).The thing a flexable dryer duct is UL listed for is as a TRANSITION connection (between the dryer itself and the Clothes Dryer Exhaust Duct). Most codes limit the length of same to 8 feet, some six, some five feet, and some manufacturers as well as some authorities having jurisdiction prohibit its use altogether. The sectional, bendable duct is never permitted to be concealed or penetrate walls or floors.

    In a fire situation aluminum BURNS.

    26 gage Rigid Galv or Stainless NOT ALUMINUM, but aluminumized steel is okay (28 g.) !!!!! NOT FLEXIBLE, NOT COILED, but RIGID. (Firm substantial, smooth walled). 16 gage drawn aluminum is ONLY for exposed areas, and not to be used in concealed areas or in rated assemblies without protection - and even then in most areas not permitted, only 26 ga. steel or equivallent, and in many jurisdictions and model codes is not permitted for the use with a gas clothes dryer at all, even if exposed. See your manufacturer's instructions and local code adoptions for details. All portions of a clothes dryer exhaust duct must be supported (most codes require at least every four feet).

    NEVER EVER apply any type of exterior insulation to a clothes dryer duct, vent, exaust flue.

    Ask your local fire marshal, building inspector, professional chimney sweep, etc. For the local rules/building codes list, ammendments, etc. and their recommenations for your region and your specific construction and venting path; and READ your OWNER'S MANUAL/INSTALLATION MANUAL for your particular GAS-FIRED CLOTHES DRYER. It likely mentions the Fuel Gas Code, likely mentions a limiatation to the number of duct "feet". Bends, elbows, changes in direction are converted to linear feet by volume, drag, etc. You have to look up your particular fittings/pieces to see what they equal. There are rules and considerations as to where the exaust gets to atmosphere - proximity to grade, walls, eaves, overhangs, etc.

    Also transitions to "exaust hood" or "flapper" "Cap", etc. that will effect both exaust of heat, products of combustion, water vapor/moisture removed from wet clothes, etc. and that allow or (integral damper only at exterior) prevent back drafting without compromising FIRE SAFETY (nothing allowed to drag, within the exaust path - to catch moisture and/or snag LINT).

    Then properly isolate and block for fire safety, weather proofing/flashing at the exterior using the correct materials, insect and rodent blocking, etc.

    DO NOT use sheet metal screws, piercing fasteners to connect your dryer exaust duct sections. DO not use male/male fittings on your exaust duct (M to F always non-obstructive in the direction of air-flow. DO mechanically fasten (brackets, bands, etc.) your exhaust duct. DO provide cleanouts wherever there is a transition in direction. DO fit a proper damper at exit exterior only, no intermediate dampers belong in your clothes dryer exhaust duct.. DO exhaust your clothes dryer duct to the outdoors.

    You must first examine the location where your dryer is located. There is obviously either an issue with your damper (potentially too close to a wall or horizontal surface allowing strong vertical winds to open or lift the damper or perhaps a lint or other obstruction preventing its closure, etc.) on the exterior and/or you have a makeup air defficiency or negative pressure situation of some sort in the environment of the room itself, or overall in your home (for example forced air systems such as FA heating, exaust fans, ventillators - heat recovery or not, direct venting appliance having intake restricted, etc.).
    Last edited by Blue RidgeParkway; 01-15-2009 at 12:46 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    Most of those cheap dryer flappers don't seal very well when closed and even flap when the wind is blowing. You might consider getting a dryer vent with a powered flapper.

    Jack
    Thanks Jack, never heard of them. I will give them a look.

    BRP,

    I appreciate your concern, but everything is to code. Ansy suggestions for eliminating the cold air infiltration?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    "Everything is to code".

    I'm sure it is.

    http://fixitnow.com/wp/2003/10/15/ap...venting-guide/

    The American Household Appliance Manufacturers Association (AHAM) recommends the use of either rigid aluminum or steel duct or spiral-wound aluminum flex hose–NOT the white vinyl hose. For any dryer, but especially gas dryers, white vinyl vent hose should never be used. If yours has this installed on it, replace it ASAP with UL-approved materials. Examples of UL-approved dryer venting materials are shown here.

    http://groups.msn.com/Appliantology/...oto&PhotoID=78

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Thumbs down Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by ****hiller View Post
    "Everything is to code".

    I'm sure it is.

    http://fixitnow.com/wp/2003/10/15/ap...venting-guide/

    The American Household Appliance Manufacturers Association (AHAM) recommends the use of either rigid aluminum or steel duct or spiral-wound aluminum flex hose–NOT the white vinyl hose. For any dryer, but especially gas dryers, white vinyl vent hose should never be used. If yours has this installed on it, replace it ASAP with UL-approved materials. Examples of UL-approved dryer venting materials are shown here.

    http://groups.msn.com/Appliantology/...oto&PhotoID=78
    No actually they (AHAM) specifically does NOT, regarding aluminum flex hose, foil or anything other than SHEET METAL, rigid or semi-rigid duct for any clothes dryer. In fact most member manufacturers specifically designate the use of HEAVY sheet metal duct exclusively for non-condensing gas clothes dryers.

    With stated permissions on the document for republication for public outreach, and with credit to AHAM, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers found at www.aham.org:

    ________
    CLOTHES DRYER FACT SHEET




    The installation and maintenance of clothes dryers are an important part of ensuring that the appliance performs as designed. The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) has reviewed many of the building codes used across the U.S. to ensure that the installation of clothes dryers is in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.


    AHAM, on behalf of its home laundry manufacturers, submitted comments to the 1999 edition of the National Fuel Gas Code (ANSI Z223.1/NFPA 54) to specify that exhaust and transition vents shall not be constructed of coiled-wire foil or plastic material and that vents be installed in accordance with the clothes dryer manufacturer’s installation instructions. AHAM recommends that clothes dryer vents be constructed of rigid sheet metal or corrugated semi-rigid sheet metal material.


    The National Fuel Gas Code offers criteria for the installation and operation of gas piping and gas equipment on consumers' premises. It is intended to promote public safety by providing requirements for the safe and satisfactory utilization of gas.


    In addition to submitting comments to the National Fuel Gas Code, AHAM suggests the following tips for the proper use and installation of residential clothes dryers. Consumers should always consult the manufacturer's instructions for guidelines specific to their clothes dryer.


    Dryer Care and Maintenance

    • Installation. The dryer venting materials are an important factor in dryer performance and safety. AHAM recommends the use of rigid sheet metal or corrugated semi-rigid sheet metal venting material. Do not use coiled-wire foil or plastic venting material. Not using the recommended venting materials could reduce airflow and drying time could be lengthened unnecessarily.

    • Maintenance. Dryers need maintenance like any other appliance. In order to keep sufficient airflow around the heating source, lint must be removed from the dryer and vent. Lint and dust can build-up over time and reduce airflow, resulting in decreased performance, by not allowing air to circulate freely through the dryer. Don't forget to clean the back of the dryer, where lint can be trapped. Clean the lint filter before and after each load. The interior of the appliance and venting system should be cleaned periodically by qualified service personnel. If you notice that the drying time is longer, clean the vent system thoroughly to ensure that there is proper airflow. Keep the area around the dryer clean and free of clutter.
    Dryer Do’s
    • Follow manufacturer’s instructions on installing the dryer and vent system.
    • Replace coiled-wire foil or plastic venting with rigid sheet metal or corrugated semi-rigid sheet metal venting.
    • Clean the lint filter before and after each cycle.
    • Inspect venting system behind dryer to ensure it is not damaged or crushed.
    Dryer Don’ts
    • Do not dry the following items in the dryer:

    • Anything containing foam, rubber or plastic (i.e. bathroom rugs, non-slip mats).

    • Any item which the dryer manufacturer's instructions specifically state "dry away from heat."
    • Glass fiber materials (unless manufacturer's instructions permit).
    • Materials on which there was anything flammable (e.g., alcohol, cooking oils, gasoline, spot removers, dry-cleaning solvents, etc.). These should be dried outdoors or in a well-ventilated room, away from heat even if they have gone through the wash cycle. Flammable substances give off vapors that could ignite or explode.
    • Fabric soiled with cooking oils.
    For more information, please call Jill Notini at 202-872-5955 ext. 318 or email jnotini@aham.org.


    This Dryer Fact Sheet may be reproduced in its entirety for community newsletters or public outreach. We request that you credit AHAM- the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers found at www.aham.org.

    ________

    Gas clothes dryers come complete with Installation and User Guides, which will include information for clearance from combustible materials, maximum length of exaust, number of bends, a minimum airflow requirement (at least) at maximum vent length (Linear Feet minus X per elbow or bend, minus X per other fitting, change of direction, or transition) and a minimum capacity for air flow at minimum vent length (CFM), a minimum duct air velocity uring normal operating conditions (in X FPM) to keep lint moving in the airstream), and back pressure limitations (usually range is between -1.0" (-25mm) water column to 0.6" (15mm) water column when measured at the connection of the dryer to the vent (you need a manometer to measure this), if it is a long vent or standard vent restriction, requirements for room venting, and specific ranges for In the event that you have lost yours, contact the manufacturer with the model and serial number of your dryer and ask how to acquire a reprint. The listed User Guide will include limitations and restrictions for proper materials, venting length, etc. for your GAS CLOTHES DRYER. In the absence of local code or restrictions, they will often reference the National Fuel Gas Code, the International Guel Gas Code, a model Mechanical Code, UL ANSI Standards and/or CSA ANSI Standards for either the Type 1 or Type 2 Gas Clothes Dryers.

    Common instructions from a Manufacturer's Included User's Guide, Instructions, Installation for Gas Clothes Dryer, non-condensing type::

    "Fire Hazard:
    Use a heavy metal vent.
    Do not use a plastic vent.
    Do not use a metal foil vent.
    Failure to follow these instructions can result in death or a fire.

    WARNING: To reduce the risk of fire, this dryer MUST BE EXHAUSTED OUTDOORS.

    Improper venting can cause moisture and lint to collect indoors, which may result in: Moisture damage to woodwork furniture, wallpaper, carpets, etc. Housecleaning problems and health problems.

    Local codes and ordinances that exist must also be met. Consult your local building inspector for more information."
    Last edited by Blue RidgeParkway; 01-11-2009 at 02:53 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    you do realize that there is an aluminum rigid duct? not just aluminum flex?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by havanagranite View Post
    you do realize that there is an aluminum rigid duct? not just aluminum flex?
    Sure do. And in many cases either model codes, listings, manufacturer's instructions, locally drafted codes, and local ammendments prohibit or restrict its use for venting GAS clothes dryers, non-condensing type (most especially if in contact with or within a certain proximity to: mortar, masonry, "concrete", "cement", etc.).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue RidgeParkway View Post
    Sure do. And in many cases either model codes, listings, manufacturer's instructions, locally drafted codes, and local ammendments prohibit or restrict its use for venting GAS clothes dryers, non-condensing type (most especially if in contact with or within a certain proximity to: mortar, masonry, "concrete", "cement", etc.).
    rigid aluminum is what you will find in most new construction in homes for venting of dryers regardless of elec or gas.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Cold clothes dryer

    Quote Originally Posted by havanagranite View Post
    rigid aluminum is what you will find in most new construction in homes for venting of dryers regardless of elec or gas.
    Nope and your saying that is some sort of fact doesn't make it so.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •