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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    56

    Default Adirondack Chair wood

    I'm finally gonna use Norm's plans and build some Adirondack Chairs this spring, but I'm not sure what wood to use. These will be my first pieces of furniture ever so I don't want to ruin some expensive wood. While Norm uses Cypress, it looks to be incredibly expensive in my neck of the woods (Western NY). I'm gonna look for Cedar but all I've found is that rough sawn stuff for molding on tract houses. I'm thinking maybe of maple, and then using a transparent colored exterior stain. Paint would be a maintenance nightmare. Any thoughts or suggestions? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,836

    Default Re: Adirondack Chair wood

    Maple is not a good choice for outdoor use. I would go with white oak it's not as durable as cypress but is a comparatively inexpensive wood for outdoor projects. It is also much harder and more durable than cedar.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,703

    Default Re: Adirondack Chair wood

    I thought Norm used mahogony for the chair he helped an assistant built recently. Probably not cheap either, but would be pretty.
    White oak is pretty durable if you keep it sealed.
    That said, I have a 5'long bench swing built from 1x4 pine that has held up fairly well for 15 years. It gets a bit of tlc and gets put away for the winter. Because of sentimental value I have replaced a few boards that rotted, but even pine for an outdoor piece has worked for me.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    56

    Default Re: Adirondack Chair wood

    Thanks everyone. Maybe I'll try clear pine for my first batch of chairs to keep the costs down. I'll use a semi transparent stain on them and see how that goes. Maybe then it would be a good idea not to use glue then to help hold it together in case down the road I need to replace a piece here and there that has started to rot.

    I do plan on putting them away for the winter and spring as my backyard is very wet and we get quite a bit of snow. So, they'd usually only be out from May-September.

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