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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Question oil forced air furance putting sout in house

    I work very hard for my pay checks. I was going to get an outside coal boiler system to replace my older heating oil forced air sytem. But the cost is out of the question at this time. The problem is last year the blower motor went and another part they were replaced with new ones. But the sout is still coming through the heat vents on the walls and through everything in the house. As I said I cannot afford to replace the furnace. I do not make that kind of money and with the cost of everything up makes it a no way at this time. What is causing this problem. I know it is not good for any of us to breath this stuff. I am going to call a repair person but I really want to know long before I call anyone what the heck is going on and if it can be repaired to hold out at least one more season. I have been fixing this old I mean old house up since I bought it but somethings are just to expensive to get to. . Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,620

    Default Re: oil forced air furance putting sout in house

    Two possibilities that I can think of, 1] the igniter is firing late and you are blowing soot out through the inspection gate and it's being picked up by the blower. I had that happen, and 2] the most dangerous, you have a crack or hole in the heat exchanger. That would need to be fixed immediately.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    1,131

    Default Re: oil forced air furance putting sout in house

    Ditto what Jack said.

    To that I will add a couple more possibilities.

    You may not be getting a late ignition, but rather have an old partially clogged nozzle that no longer throws a nice pattern. It may be squirting fuel instead. If so, that stream isn't getting burned cleanly and that can result in alot of soot woofing out the little inspection door if the gasket on that doesn't seal well. And/or the combustion air may be set too lean or some dust bunnies are blocking off the intake ports for that. Again, in order for either of these problems to be *the* cause in soot emerging from all the hot air registers in the house would require that the soot is leaking from the firebox into the air next to the unit and then being picked up by the blower...which would also require a leak in the ductwork surrounding that blower. If this is the case, you should have gobs of soot settled on and around the furnace itself.

    Another possibility is that the HE is really clogged up with soot which can easily cause soot-woofing from the firebox. Also, a HE with its interior covered by even a thin layer of soot will cost you money this coming winter. The soot acts as an insulation, interfering with the fast and effective exchange of the heat to the house. The heat that doesn't exchange fast & freely goes up the chimney instead.

    Another possibility is that your chimney isn't drafting properly. It may be clogged or choked down.
    This too, could result in soot and CO escaping into the basement.

    The other likely scenario would be that hole in the heat exchanger that Jack spoke of. This is a VERY dangerous/life threatening situation. If there is a leak in the heat exchanger, a lot of carbon monoxide is being delivered throughout the house and all occupants are breathing it. I suspect you don't have a CO detector in the house right now. I highly recommend that you get one...and not a cheapy either. Get a Nighthawk or better. Around $50 for one that will detect both CO and gas leaks. Leave the First Alert units on the shelf. I reccomend the plug-in units for most households. No batteries to buy and if the power is off, the furnace/boiler can't run anyway....and that is the most likely source of large volumes of CO in the event of a faulty condition.

    A hole in the HE may be fixable to get you thru one more season. It depends upon the general condition of the entire HE and just where the hole/crack is. It all depends. One thing is for sure though; if you attempt to patch a hole in the HE....it has to be done correctly (and with the right materials) or it won't truly be sealed and/or won't last. Hence the need for that CO detector which will tell you if you were successful...and will alert you if the patch fails down the road. Don't delay...buy one today.

    http://www.carbonmonoxidekills.com/
    Last edited by goldhiller; 08-15-2008 at 10:12 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    2

    Default Re: oil forced air furance putting sout in house

    Thank you for your help. The darn thing started doing it at the end of last years season. Planned on and outside coal boiler this year but things happen and can not until next. Tahnks again for the help.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
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    5,620

    Default Re: oil forced air furance putting sout in house

    Quote Originally Posted by zorah111 View Post
    Thank you for your help. The darn thing started doing it at the end of last years season. Planned on and outside coal boiler this year but things happen and can not until next. Tahnks again for the help.
    I thought you might be interested in this http://www.motherearthnews.com/shopp...temnumber=1835

    It may be a cheaper alternative for you.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

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