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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    14

    Default Wood Stove in basement

    I have a wood stove in my basement and I am trying to heat the first floor that is approx. 600 sq ft. What options do I have? should I cut a hole in th floor( and if how many and where), open the basement door, ??? Currently by using the stove I am not seeing much improvement by just heating the stove, any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,557

    Default Re: Wood Stove in basement

    Although heat rises its not very efficient to try to heat through a floor and chances are you are drawing combustion replacement air from the outside if the basement is not sealed. You could try gravity vents in the floor. How many and where is hard to say when I don't know you house or its layout.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Wood Stove in basement

    Sorry to bombard you with questions....but here goes.....

    Can you please describe the basement, finished or unfinished (insulated or cold & drafty), what make & model wood stove, with or without blowers to help move the warm air off the stove, where is the stairway with respect to the stove, how many BTU's is the stove, is there currently duct work in the basement for the primary furnace (supply and return?), what is the layout of the first floor - open floor plan or many separate rooms, is the house well insulated and do you have good windows or older drafty ones, what kind of draft is your stove / chimney pulling (manometer can be used to measure this), is there a manual pipe damper on your stove or flue pipe, what area are you located and what kid of outside temps do you experience?

    It is possible to do what you want, it may be easier or harder depending on the answers to the above questions. We live in a ranch home with an unfinished basement where our 92,000 btu stove resides. It heats our whole house from the basement. It is 73* in the LR as I type this and its about 30* outside. When I got up this morning it had dropped down to 69* in here when it was 18* outside. Our furnace never has to kick on unless I want a break from running the stove. I believe that each installation is a little different and the suggestions I would make would be different depending on your layout.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Wood Stove in basement

    my basement is unfinished, the stove has 96,000 btu and no blower. the stairway is about 8 feet from the stove, the stove is actually facing the stairway. The furnace does have a supply and return in the basement. the first floor is two small bedrooms, a small bath, and a kitchen/living room that take up more than half of the space. The stove works through a chimney from the previous coal stove. The stove also has a manual damper. I live in PA where winters are cold, however rarely reaching below zero. Most temps are above 30 degrees in the winter. I actually have created a floor register with an eight inch fan that is inbetween the floor joist, almost directly above the stove. I hope this helps you in helping me. Thanks.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Wood Stove in basement

    96k btu's should be more than enough! What is the temp in the basement when the stove is running, 90*??!! That is great that it lines up with the stairway. If your basement is also not very warm then I suspect you are sending most of your heat up the chimney rather than into the room. Better use of your damper will keep you from sending the heat up the chimney.

    Before cutting any more holes in the floor, I would simply open the door to the basement. The idea is to have warm air pushed up the stairway at the ceiling (in addition to the warm air through the vent) and the cooler return air will flow down the steps at floor level. Your heat circulation issue may just be lacking a return path for the cooler air which the open door should help solve.

    Does your stove have an option for a blower, that would be ideal for pushing the warm air up the steps since it lines up nicely. If not then maybe a small fan on low speed would push the air towards the stairwell. Our stove has a blower and like yours our stove lines up with the stairway and it works very well having the warm air come right up the steps.

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