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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: How to cut a notch on kitchen cabinet crown moulding

    From your pic's it doesn't look like the crown goes all the way to the ceiling, although that might be an optical illusion. If yours do go all to the ceiling or to a soffit then the following probably won't be much help to you.

    I put crown on our cabinets which are in a kitchen with a cathedral ceiling (kitchen remodel was last winters project). I was playing around with the homepage features a couple weeks ago and there are pics in an album if you click on my user id.

    I had the same situation you did with the reveal and I notched the cabinet itself with a japanese flush cut saw so the crown would lay flat to the cabinet around the corners. It only took about 2 or 3 very careful strokes to make about a 1/8" deep cut, and then a couple more strokes to come down from the top of the cabinet to meet the kerf. It turned out fine, I would recommend a few practice cuts on some scrap to hone your technique. Since I had easy access to the top of the cab's, I nailed the crown to a 1x4 frame I installed on the top of the cabinets. I beveled the front edge of the 1x4 to match the angle of the crown.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: How to cut a notch on kitchen cabinet crown moulding

    Hi bp21901,

    Thanks for the info...How do you prevent that saw blade from cutting into the cabinet side..Do you just cut part way in and use a chisel to remove the rest of the material...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: How to cut a notch on kitchen cabinet crown moulding

    The break in the shadow line in the upper right of the second photo leads me to the conclusion that this crown is well below the ceiling.

    When returning traditional cabinetry with face frames and "suspended" or "floating" crowning not uncommon to use a side skin return panel.

    If your skipping that step with finished carcass then adjustments to the moulding common. You'd need to deinstall that piece of crown to notch cannot do it in place.

    A pull saw is what was last referred to. I wouldn't recommend notching your face frame top corner end, you could end up with a compromise (read cabinet falling apart if well loaded and the remaining wood splits or the side panel pops) of your carcass, there's a lot of stress already on an upper carcass mounted on the wall - then its loaded).

    When you have suspended crown (no ceiling or top nailer) you install blocks (intermediate on long runs) or a nailer strip. You cut (rip) its "face" to match the spring angle of your crown. Yes you attach to carcass and to the blocks higher up in the profile.

    By notching the return crown backside (a coping saw works, or even a rasp) you'll be bringing it in to a shorter distance termination on the face of the miter joint nearest the cabinet. You'll likely need to shave the face crown just a bit shorter before the joint back beveled a bit. Again not something you can do in place with a simple miter cut without opening up the joint (not a good thing).
    Last edited by Blue RidgeParkway; 01-06-2009 at 05:08 PM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: How to cut a notch on kitchen cabinet crown moulding

    Quote Originally Posted by tonyc56 View Post
    Hi bp21901,

    Thanks for the info...How do you prevent that saw blade from cutting into the cabinet side..Do you just cut part way in and use a chisel to remove the rest of the material...
    You very carefully cut across the reveal at the level where the crown will sit, the depth of the cut should be just shy of the cabinet side. It should only take a couple of strokes to get to the correct depth. You could use a chisel to come down the reveal on the side of the cabinet. Or if you have a flush cut saw, carefully cut the reveal coming down the side of the cabinet. The saw is designed so it will not mar the side of the cabinet. Make a couple practice cuts on scrap to get the feel for it.

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