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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    13

    Default Painting Interior Trim

    It's time for me to paint my interior trim work which was originally done in an oil base/enamel. Do I have to use oil again or can I use latex with a high sheen, and if so do I have to prime over the enamel first.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
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    1,770

    Default Re: Painting Interior Trim

    Larry,

    Latex enamel only has one advantage over oil paints for trim, they yellow less with age. When it comes to good adhesion, a hard, durable, smooth and non "ropey" appearance, oil wins everytime. Oil has inherently better adhesion over existing oil paints. A de-glossing with liquid deglosser or fine sandpaper and a good washing is all the preparation that is needed to assure adhesion. Oil is also available in high gloss versions. Oil has longer wet time and flows out, leveling brush marks. It takes a real pro to get latex to be passable in appearance with a brush. Sprayed latex can lookj quite good. Latex does not get hard as does oil. It retains a gummy feel which gets worse in humid conditons.

    You can paint over the oil paint with latex , but I would highly advise the use of one of the undercoaters designed to adhere to the slick oil paint. These can be either oil or acrylic based.

    There are some vastly improved latex enamels on the market now. The Muralo Company ( which owns the trade mark "Spackle" ) makes a line called Ultra which uses ceramic bead technology. It is the closest thing I have used which approaches oil in working characteristics. Unfortunately, it is not available all over the country.

    Hope I have not added to your confusion.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    1,131

    Default Re: Painting Interior Trim

    I will basically ditto what ordjen had to say.

    I will also add that because oil-based paints are tougher, they will hold up much better to washing/scrubbing to remove dirt and stains...as well as general wear and tear.

    That being said...waterborne/latex paints are very popular for a number of reasons... including faster dry times, less objectionable odors and easier clean-up of equipment. If you buy a quality latex paint (Sherwin-Williams, Benjamin Moore, etc)...they are far better than the latexes of the past. Despite that fact they are still not as durable/tough as oil-based paints.

    But neither choice is really right or wrong.

    There are already areas in the country where OB paints can only be bought in quart size, if at all. Rumors abound that OB may one day be unavailable anywhere in order to meet new VOC regulations.

    (Adding some Floetrol to latex paint will slow down the drying rate, make the paint more "workable" with a brush and will consequently result in a nicer looking finish. Rarely do you have to add it at the recommended rate in order to get that better result. 1/2 or even 1/3 of that will usually do the deed.)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,770

    Default Re: Painting Interior Trim

    ****hiller,

    I'd have to agree with you that oil paint's days are numbered. They are barely to be found now-a-days in the big box stores. One has to go to a "real" paint store that has a professional clientel to find oil paint and decent brushes to apply it.

    I always say there is good news and bad news about latex paint. The good news is that they dry fast. The bad news is that they dry fast It is that fast drying time that that makes them difficlut for even a pro to use, more or less an amateur. For sure, Floetrol does help considerably. Also, buy the best brush you can afford if using the stuff. I am partial to Purdy's Nylox series for trim work with interior latexes. Amateurs too often underestimate the difference a good brush can make.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,795

    Default Re: Painting Interior Trim

    I have to agree with ordjen. I try to use only oil based on trim and a good brush . I would rather spend a little extra time cleaning an oil brush than the extra time it takes to repaint the latex.
    Jack
    Last edited by JLMCDANIEL; 09-04-2008 at 12:27 AM.
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Painting Interior Trim

    I'm the same dilemma. We moved into our house 7 years ago, with 3 growing kids, a dog and after a laminate floor install the trim molding and door frames need some TLC. The previous owners used oild paint and I hate using oil paints but after reading the previous posts it seems as though that's my best choice.

    I have some questions I hope I can get answers to:

    a) I should be able to remove a piece of molding to have the paint matched at a home center right?

    b) There are some scratches in some areas, should I sand them and paint over?

    c) I installed laminate floor a while back and covered the expansion gap with primed quarter round but I never painted it, can I just paint over it and paint the wall molding at the same time?

    d) What would be the best way to clean it before paint it?

    Thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,795

    Default Re: Painting Interior Trim

    Quote Originally Posted by rayrod View Post
    I'm the same dilemma. We moved into our house 7 years ago, with 3 growing kids, a dog and after a laminate floor install the trim molding and door frames need some TLC. The previous owners used oild paint and I hate using oil paints but after reading the previous posts it seems as though that's my best choice.

    I have some questions I hope I can get answers to:

    a) I should be able to remove a piece of molding to have the paint matched at a home center right?
    It should be a flat piece, and they should do at least 2 samples on 2 different areas for matching.
    b) There are some scratches in some areas, should I sand them and paint over?
    Depends on how bad the scratches are, surface scratches can be painted over deeper ones should at least be feathered out.
    c) I installed laminate floor a while back and covered the expansion gap with primed quarter round but I never painted it, can I just paint over it and paint the wall molding at the same time?
    No, you should re-prime. For primer to work as it should you should paint soon after it is primed.

    d) What would be the best way to clean it before paint it?
    If you use mineral spirits and steel wool, you can clean and de-gloss at the same time.

    Thanks
    Hope that helps,
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

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