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  1. #11
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    Dec 2008
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    10

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    Quote Originally Posted by rrbigdad View Post
    If you know about where they are turn the heat on and find the warm spot. or get someone with a heat scaning camera it will show where the heat or corld is behind the sheetrock. good luck
    There is ****NOT**** a map of the locations. This is a new system without the condenser/compressor attached. It is AC COOLING not HEAT.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    10

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    There is ****NOT**** a map of the locations. No idea where the vents should be. This is a new system without the condenser/compressor attached. It is AC COOLING not HEAT. Plumbing contractor with the information will not respond to phone calls. Building contractor out of business and money, already been sued by other home owners.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
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    4,045

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    Neddy .... what's above this space .... an attic?

    If so then you could locate the ducting from there and pierce a nail or screw through the ceiling from above marking the spots.

    Otherwise if there is no access from above you may end up cutting access holes here and there to see if you can locate them.
    Perhaps another HVAC contrator can provide you with a better idea where these would likely be placed that's common for your area.

    Just a thought.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,611

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    The most common locations for A/C vents is over (or under) windows.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  5. #15
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    Dec 2008
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    10

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    Above the ceiling is another floor!

  6. #16
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    Dec 2008
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    10

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    The most common locations for A/C vents is over (or under) windows.
    I am not interested in hacking up my ceiling. I DO NOT HAVE A MAP/DRAWING/NOTE/ETC...

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    Fence,

    I have two squirrel-cage blowers in my shop. One is used as an exhaust fan (mounted permanently in the exterior wall)and the other for various purposes depending upon need at the moment. I also have three more of these blowers which I take to jobsites when needed.

    If I cover over either the entire outlet of the fan or a portion of it, the motor speed increases. This is easy to hear with nothing more than the human ear. It speeds up because the motor is doing less work.

    These are air blowers/movers, not air pumps/compressors. If the blower cannot "get rid" of air in its vanes, it doesn't take any in either. It may develop a certain amount of static pressure in a closed duct, but that is less work than moving great amounts of air as when it has a "free flow" situation. (Shop vacs have a different type of "fan" on them.)

    I have on many occasions used one of the blowers over at the shop in just such a "choked" output application to circulate air across the ceiling of the shop only. Situations where I need some gentle air movement, but don't want a draft across the work itself. The rig I have on the front of the blower allows me to slide a piece of plywood in place which has a 6" duct ell attached and then a length of pipe sticking up toward the ceiling. The motor rpms go up when I install this and it runs all day without overheating the motor. The motor is actually quite cool to the touch, comparatively speaking.
    Last edited by goldhiller; 12-30-2008 at 10:49 AM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    Quote Originally Posted by Neddy View Post
    There is ****NOT**** a map of the locations. No idea where the vents should be. This is a new system without the condenser/compressor attached. It is AC COOLING not HEAT. Plumbing contractor with the information will not respond to phone calls. Building contractor out of business and money, already been sued by other home owners.
    Quote Originally Posted by Neddy View Post
    Above the ceiling is another floor!
    Do you know that ducts/vents/trunkwork are even installed behind already? How do you know this?

    Possibly some creative detective work with a temperature sensing imaging system such as infrared imaging may help you pin it down. Also possible a permit and plans search with your local building authority's office may provide some clues (although actual install may have deviated from original plans and not been documented). Even *IF* there IS something installed, no one can say from here if that is WHERE they SHOULD BE. Do you know what a heating/cooling audit is?

    Normally in the construction process of new homes an inspection is required before wall and ceiling surfaces are allowed to be installed - perhaps you could track down the inspection site visit history and you might be lucky enough to pick the brains (memory) of the individual inspector who signed off on permission to cover the walls, or locate some similar records, notes, memorializations at the building office?

    However if the construction "issues" and monetary "issues" of the contractor/GC/developer were such that they were multiply sued and now out of buisness - there could be other issues behind those wall coverings that need addressing. Abandoning duct work leaving chutes for spread of products of combustion - should there be smoke or fire down the road wouldn't be good either, you may end up having to do some deconstruction.

    Much depends on what evidence you do know about - would be good to know how you know there is anything about ducts being there in the first place and the type of system there and where you're located as well as the construction type.

    Finding a HVAC contractor who is a certified installer/dealer experienced in retrofitting the same system and materials along with if necessary a thermal imaging spe******t may be your "ticket" to minimally invasive detection. If you know you have metal duct work for example perhaps a metal detector or multi-function wall stud finder. A radio signal device or camera might be fished down existing ducts and sensed from the interior - without details can't recommend which approach - but someone experienced in your type of system materials and visiting on site could likely suggest a least invasive approach for this, we can try from here but not without SOME DETAILS.

    Give us some details on what you DO KNOW about the construction - For example the direction of support of the joists, i-joists, trusses, or timbers providing the floor structural support - the details please. Pre-fabricated componants - a lien release of lien search on the property (and pre-divided tract if subdivision) may provide clues, perhaps researching filed documents in the other court cases you are aware of may also provide some clues to assist in your detective work! This would provide a clue as to the possiblities for the direction options as to how such might be run. If there is an exposed end. What material might comprise this duct work, if there are areas where it can be seen such as a trunk, or source point, etc What clues you have about how the system distribution - source point. Details please - it is impossible to guess. photos may also be helpful. What you know about the insulation in outside walls, insulation type on exterior, etc.

    Also photos of the walls near the ceilings and the ceilings - markings on them (usually in PENCIL) will USUALLY indicate the approximate locations have any circles, squares or rectangles with an X drawn through them? scribbles of numbers, arrows? Or has someone painted or primered over this already?

    Phone calls obviously not enough. Sounds like you might need to at least track down information and write a letter to the "plumbing contractor" if you know he has the info you seek. Perhaps seek the assistance of an attorney who is experienced in residental real estate, construction and contractor litigation. Sometimes a well written letter, or one from an attorney, can spur a response. Some authorities having jurisdiction require completion BONDS from contractors and subs - might be assistance in information gathering from your building office OR filling a claim on those completion bonds, should they exist. Again not knowing your location, etc. an attorney consultation might be worthwhile even just brainstorming your potential avenues of information gathering while you consider your options.
    Last edited by Blue RidgeParkway; 12-30-2008 at 11:14 AM.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    10

    Unhappy Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue RidgeParkway View Post
    Do you know that ducts/vents/trunkwork are even installed behind already? How do you know this?

    Possibly some creative detective work with a temperature sensing imaging system such as infrared imaging may help you pin it down. Also possible a permit and plans search with your local building authority's office may provide some clues (although actual install may have deviated from original plans and not been documented). Even *IF* there IS something installed, no one can say from here if that is WHERE they SHOULD BE. Do you know what a heating/cooling audit is?

    Normally in the construction process of new homes an inspection is required before wall and ceiling surfaces are allowed to be installed - perhaps you could track down the inspection site visit history and you might be lucky enough to pick the brains (memory) of the individual inspector who signed off on permission to cover the walls, or locate some similar records, notes, memorializations at the building office?

    However if the construction "issues" and monetary "issues" of the contractor/GC/developer were such that they were multiply sued and now out of buisness - there could be other issues behind those wall coverings that need addressing. Abandoning duct work leaving chutes for spread of products of combustion - should there be smoke or fire down the road wouldn't be good either, you may end up having to do some deconstruction.

    Much depends on what evidence you do know about - would be good to know how you know there is anything about ducts being there in the first place and the type of system there and where you're located as well as the construction type.

    Finding a HVAC contractor who is a certified installer/dealer experienced in retrofitting the same system and materials along with if necessary a thermal imaging spe******t may be your "ticket" to minimally invasive detection. If you know you have metal duct work for example perhaps a metal detector or multi-function wall stud finder. A radio signal device or camera might be fished down existing ducts and sensed from the interior - without details can't recommend which approach - but someone experienced in your type of system materials and visiting on site could likely suggest a least invasive approach for this, we can try from here but not without SOME DETAILS.

    Give us some details on what you DO KNOW about the construction - For example the direction of support of the joists, i-joists, trusses, or timbers providing the floor structural support - the details please. Pre-fabricated componants - a lien release of lien search on the property (and pre-divided tract if subdivision) may provide clues, perhaps researching filed documents in the other court cases you are aware of may also provide some clues to assist in your detective work! This would provide a clue as to the possiblities for the direction options as to how such might be run. If there is an exposed end. What material might comprise this duct work, if there are areas where it can be seen such as a trunk, or source point, etc What clues you have about how the system distribution - source point. Details please - it is impossible to guess. photos may also be helpful. What you know about the insulation in outside walls, insulation type on exterior, etc.

    Also photos of the walls near the ceilings and the ceilings - markings on them (usually in PENCIL) will USUALLY indicate the approximate locations have any circles, squares or rectangles with an X drawn through them? scribbles of numbers, arrows? Or has someone painted or primered over this already?

    Phone calls obviously not enough. Sounds like you might need to at least track down information and write a letter to the "plumbing contractor" if you know he has the info you seek. Perhaps seek the assistance of an attorney who is experienced in residental real estate, construction and contractor litigation. Sometimes a well written letter, or one from an attorney, can spur a response. Some authorities having jurisdiction require completion BONDS from contractors and subs - might be assistance in information gathering from your building office OR filling a claim on those completion bonds, should they exist. Again not knowing your location, etc. an attorney consultation might be worthwhile even just brainstorming your potential avenues of information gathering while you consider your options.

    Do you know that ducts/vents/trunkwork are even installed behind High-velocityalready? How do you know this?
    The house is two story with an atic above the second story. The duct work is visible for the second floor installation
    , the second floor is not the problem. I CAN see the ductwork run through the rafters to the first floor. The house has four rooms and a bath on the first floor and four rooms and a bath on the second floor, but the foot print is dramatically different. The duct fork is for a High-velocity system

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,053

    Default Re: Contractor sheetrocked over my AC Vents

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    The most common locations for A/C vents is over (or under) windows.
    And, in my experience, the cans are proud of the framing which means that there should be bulges where an A/C can is buried. If there are no obvious bumps in the ceiling as seen from ground level, get on a ladder with a sight-line along the surface of the ceiling and see if you can detect any from that vantage point. Sometimes holding a bright light at an extreme angle will help locate bumps in a surface as well.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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