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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2

    Cool Painting Laminated Cabinets

    I would like to paint over my laminated cabinets. There is a product that I saw on line called ESP. it is a simple one-step process. I don't know if it is a scam or what.... the presidents name is Brendan C. Igoe. Maybe it's "see I go with your money?" does anyone know of a product of this nature. Ihave asked around and no one seems to know of anything except sanding etc. and at my age 64, that is not an option. Thanks Walt64

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Painting Laminated Cabinets

    Quote Originally Posted by walt64 View Post
    I would like to paint over my laminated cabinets. There is a product that I saw on line called ESP. it is a simple one-step process. I don't know if it is a scam or what.... the presidents name is Brendan C. Igoe. Maybe it's "see I go with your money?" does anyone know of a product of this nature. Ihave asked around and no one seems to know of anything except sanding etc. and at my age 64, that is not an option. Thanks Walt64
    I would like to add that the product I am looking for is a type of primer or adhesive that would adhere to the laminate so that I may paint over it. thanks again.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,794

    Default Re: Painting Laminated Cabinets

    I am not familiar with the ESP product. I would suggest youuse a primer such as Gliddens "Gripper" which is water based, or Zinssers "Bin" which is a shellac based product. Both have excellent adhesion. Obviously, the cabinets should be clean and free of oil or grease. If the laminate is a high gloss varity, I would scuff sand it with fine sandpaper.

    If you have spray equuipment, Bin sprays very well, better then the heavier based Gripper. Its solvent is alcohol however, so clean up is somewhat more involved then with water based products. Bin is very fast drying, sticks like crasy, levels well and does not "fish eye" should you have missed a speck of grease.

    Either a water based of oil based finish coat can then be used. Acrylics have the advantage of being non-yellowing, especially in a kitchen environment. However, acrylics are difficult to apply with a brush, leaving brush or roller marks. It can be sprayed if you have the proper equipment. It does not spray well with a siphon spray system as it has to be thinned too much. Oil can be sprayed more easily. If possible, remove all the doors and spray in the horizontal position.

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