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Thread: Home network

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Default Home network

    I am planning a wired home network. Some may wonder why a wired home network. To me two reasons reliability and speed. Wireless is generally slower and less reliable than wired. I am planning to use CAT6 cabling with a router, at least one switch and probably some access points for use with my laptop computer. Some say CAT6 is overkill, but with wanting to stream video and knowing that most likely the future holds only higher bandwidth needs I figure a little overkill now is a good idea. I was wondering if anyone else had done this or had any ideas or helpful input.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Home network

    Yep -- my prefernce is also a hardwired wired setup.
    Don't know if you have the router yet and how many ports you'll need but, generally the routers will usually have enough ports with a built in switch --- somewhere between 4 - 8 ports --- more can be had with higher end routers --- 16 standard for example. Around here it takes some hunting to locate a wired router these days since the trendy market is for wirless units.

    Cat6 is a high end cable with Cat5E ( not Cat5 ) being pretty much close in specs and generally there is a price savings --- depends where you purchase. Keep in mind you will also need the appropriate RJ45 jacks since CAT6 is a thicker gage conductor than say CAT5E.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    7

    Default Re: Home network

    Quote Originally Posted by canuk View Post
    Yep -- my prefernce is also a hardwired wired setup.
    Don't know if you have the router yet and how many ports you'll need but, generally the routers will usually have enough ports with a built in switch --- somewhere between 4 - 8 ports --- more can be had with higher end routers --- 16 standard for example. Around here it takes some hunting to locate a wired router these days since the trendy market is for wirless units.

    Cat6 is a high end cable with Cat5E ( not Cat5 ) being pretty much close in specs and generally there is a price savings --- depends where you purchase. Keep in mind you will also need the appropriate RJ45 jacks since CAT6 is a thicker gage conductor than say CAT5E.
    Thanks for the advice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    37

    Default Re: Home network

    Going with a router that has the proper amount of ports needed is the best way. The more appliances you get on a network that are directing traffic, the more packet loss and congestion there is and therefore will slow your network back down. Switches are not as efficient as routers and even smart switches have a much higher chance of bottle-necking. Cat5e is going to be plenty for you. FYI for everybody who might be reading this post, many records have been set for traffic capabilities with cat5e and have gone way higher than the 10/100/1000 capabilities that you are going to find on semi-affordable routers. Food for thought as well, be sure that you place your router in as central a location as possible. Depending on the size of your home, you have the real possibility of weakening your signal strength by the time you get to your destination.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    17

    Default Re: Home network

    After having installed a Cat5 wired network at home, I would advise for you to have a connection testing tool if you are crimping the ends yourself (which is most likely). Even one wire off can lead to a dead connection, and it will save lots of time, even if you are confident in your crimping abilities.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Pacific Northwet
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    1,360

    Default Re: Home network

    Quote Originally Posted by scfd529 View Post
    Going with a router that has the proper amount of ports needed is the best way. The more appliances you get on a network that are directing traffic, the more packet loss and congestion there is and therefore will slow your network back down. Switches are not as efficient as routers and even smart switches have a much higher chance of bottle-necking.
    Not true. Hubs (as opposed to switches) do have a bottleneck issue in that all traffic is echoed to all ports. Switches, on the other hand, route traffic only to the computer it is destined for (Layer 2 Switching). Your average router that has four LAN ports is nothing more than a router plus a switch in a single case and provides no bandwidth advantage over separate routers and switches. Different routers will have different WAN-to-LAN and LAN-to-WAN throughput performance. There are some routers that are actually slower than your Internet connection! Here's a good site that ranks router speed.

    Hubs are no longer manufactured; they are obsolete technology.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
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    2

    Default Re: Home network

    I have been doing Networking for several years as well as installing structured cable and fiber optics. Hard wire and Fiber is the prefered route for networking, mainly for security and signal strength, but in certain circumstances, wireless
    is more practical. But keep a few things in mind when you consider wireless: 1) Wireless signals as a rule uses the "line of sight" method of communication. If there are any obstructions between the wireless router and your PC or Laptop ie: different floors, ventilation ducts, light fixtures, appliances, microwave
    ovens, cordless telephones, and aluminum siding, the strength of the signal decreases in strength, or you will loose signal completely. 2) Wireless networks also have to be secured with an encryption code so anyone outside your network cannot tap into your systems via file and print sharing, and steal your internet
    signal you are paying for. Worse case scenario is someone tapping your router for free internet and sending threatening messages to government officials using your IP address, and who will have to provide an answer...YOU!

    You also have to make sure your wiring is run correctly by staying away from electric motors, AC units, lights, or electrical panels, and to be sure the termination points are properly terminated, or you will have interference and/or no signal. A good way is to have a certification on the connections ran to ensure good conductivity.

    Routers can handle most home and small business networks, but it is also a good idea to utilize a switch/hub to help distribute the signal and take a load off the router.

    Hope this information helps.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Home network

    if your can build a strong network in your home, and build a new technology in it, then it will increase the value of your property and more attractive.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Home network

    Also keep in mind that Ethernet and HDMI are very close cousins. You can route HDMI signals over two CAT6 cables with full DNLA support. CAT5e works too, but if you want full 1080p, go CAT6

    I use a Sabrent kit to extend my laptop's HDMI output to my theater receiver. Works well.

    I haven't tried to run this through a hub or switch yet.

    This shouldn't be confused with HDMI 1.4 with Ethernet.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    203

    Default Re: Home network

    Quote Originally Posted by js6seaj View Post
    To me two reasons reliability and speed. Wireless is generally slower and less reliable than wired. I am planning to use CAT6 cabling
    There is a third BIG reason to not go wireless, and that is security. If you plan to stay there long then I would use CAT6a instead to futureproof.

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