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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    1

    Default Termite Resistant Joists

    There is evidence of termite damage and a lot of moisture in the basement of my house and the joists need to be replaced. I would like to know if pressure treated joists are a safe option for use indoors, exposed in the basement. Is there an issue with using pressure treated wood indoors? Is there off gassing of harmful vapors and/or chemicals that might become airborne in the house? Can they be left exposed or should they be painted?

    I have heard of using pressure treated wood for window/door and other framing that eventually gets finished or enclosed, but not for indoor use as joists or exposed to the environment. Does this seem like a reasonable alternative for insect/moisture proof joists indoors and does anyone have experience with this? Is it safe to have pressure treated wood exposed like that and does it effect indoor air quality?

    Any comments/advice would be much appreciated!

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Termite Resistant Joists

    Hi consider installing joists and then applying with a weed sprayer this product spaying the wood members not only rids these pests but many many more and very easy to apply and little cost .

    http://doyourownpestcontrol.com/timbor.htm#directions

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
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    1,604

    Default Re: Termite Resistant Joists

    i think the more important thing to do is have the house inspected for infestation and treated if needed. Wood won't rot from a humid basement, but water intrusion from improper flashing, improperly installed siding, door, windows, etc. will.
    I've never heard of off gassing from the new treated wood, but maybe. The chemicals in the wood are water borne and don't involve solvents I think.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    1,387

    Default Re: Termite Resistant Joists

    Quote Originally Posted by ed21 View Post
    i think the more important thing to do is have the house inspected for infestation and treated if needed. Wood won't rot from a humid basement, but water intrusion from improper flashing, improperly installed siding, door, windows, etc. will.
    I've never heard of off gassing from the new treated wood, but maybe. The chemicals in the wood are water borne and don't involve solvents I think.
    Hi the moisture does not cause rot fungus that grows real good in and on moist wood does. Off gassing of treated lumber goes on, smell a piece. The good news is some treated lumber now now near so damaging to the environment.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maryland
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    Default Re: Termite Resistant Joists

    I guess you're right, if you can smell it, it is off gassing. When I hear off gassing I think of formaldehyde or other petrochemical gasses, most of which don't necessarily smell.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,745

    Default Re: Termite Resistant Joists

    There is a borate treated and sealed wood that is safe for interior use. Haven't seen it at the home centers yet though.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: Termite Resistant Joists

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
    Hi the moisture does not cause rot fungus that grows real good in and on moist wood does. Off gassing of treated lumber goes on, smell a piece. The good news is some treated lumber now now near so damaging to the environment.
    I don't believe there is much concern from PT lumber off gassing . The main concern was for the previous CCA treated wood products leaching arsenic. That previous issue has been rectified by the new ACQ solution for pressure treating lumber products.
    Keep in mind pressure treated lumber has been and still used indoors for some areas of construction. Pressure tread wood foundations or some local codes require PT bottom plates used when wood wall framing in basements, are two examples.

    As for the OP's situation, you could simply use regular construction grade lumber and use the Tim-bor product or coat the lumber with Borate solution , which is the main ingredient of Tim-bor anyway. Also, Borate is the main ingredient used for insect protection and a fire retardant in cellulose insulation.

    There is also treated lumber available that is advertised to be a safe product called Blue wood ( google to find more info. )

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