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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default 10" wall installing exterior french doors

    Hi got a deal on new 6' exterior wood french doors but the wall is 10" thick. These pre- trimmed for4" wall doors will have a deep wall cavity. So thought i could step down a few layers of interior trim to make the 10" cavity look custom finished. Figure using 3/4" trim and stepping 3 or 4 sizes down to recess the interior opening. Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    7,190

    Default Re: 10" wall installing exterior french doors

    Not following what you're describing. Can you post some pics?
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default Re: 10" wall installing exterior french doors

    Hi,
    The doors will be mounted on the exterior, and you need to fill the "extension jamb: region of the 10" thick wall. I follow that. If you went straight back from the door with a perpendicular jamb, the doors wouldn't open much past 90 degr. That would kind of bother me, and the aggravating fact is that the light coming in would also be attenuated by the close, deep jambs. So, (if you have yet to frame the opening) here's my suggestion. Whatever the trim width in the room, let's say it's 3 1/4" casing, frame a 2x4 wall stub with two studs all around the door, pad out with 1/2" clear ply in place of sheetrock, and apply the stock casing. The rest of the extension jamb would then be splayed out at a 30 to 45* angle to allow the doors to open pretty far, and help the tunnel effect go away. The head extension could be parallel to the floor, or splayed as well. I think I prefer it flat. At the wall, another round of casing would be applied to the splayed jambs as on any cased opening.
    S_M
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    1,387

    Default Re: 10" wall installing exterior french doors

    Quote Originally Posted by Sombreuil_mongrel View Post
    Hi,
    The doors will be mounted on the exterior, and you need to fill the "extension jamb: region of the 10" thick wall. I follow that. If you went straight back from the door with a perpendicular jamb, the doors wouldn't open much past 90 degr. That would kind of bother me, and the aggravating fact is that the light coming in would also be attenuated by the close, deep jambs. So, (if you have yet to frame the opening) here's my suggestion. Whatever the trim width in the room, let's say it's 3 1/4" casing, frame a 2x4 wall stub with two studs all around the door, pad out with 1/2" clear ply in place of sheetrock, and apply the stock casing. The rest of the extension jamb would then be splayed out at a 30 to 45* angle to allow the doors to open pretty far, and help the tunnel effect go away. The head extension could be parallel to the floor, or splayed as well. I think I prefer it flat. At the wall, another round of casing would be applied to the splayed jambs as on any cased opening.
    S_M
    Hi SM as always thanks you have great suggestions. I had not thought of how the doors would bind when opening.
    I had thought of recessing the do into the center of the opening but cannot figure out how to obtain a threshold that is that wide. Will cogitate more while on holiday from the project for a few weeks.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,203

    Default Re: 10" wall installing exterior french doors

    Are your doors a unit that have the threshold built in? Then, you just need something to "fill" the gap between the unit and the start of the existing floor. We have run into this several times. Like in masonry walls. The old brick or rockwork has to be made level. You could take some amount (like one course of brick or some quantity of stone) out of the way, and pour a concrete base (tiler's "dry pack" floor mud is great!) and set PT sleepers into this bed while wet to later take an extension of flooring. If you overlay the new mortar bed with some ice & water shield membrane, you can actually lay the flooring the next day when it's set up, if you used dry-pack, which as the name implies is mixed with just a very small amount of water. Regular concrete wait until it's no longer green-looking. Another thought is to lower it by another 3/4" and set plywood subfloor beneath, then finish flooring; kinda depends on what the flooring is, whether a subfloor is absolutely called for. Subfloor in strips can be run underneath the old floor in the joist bays to tie things together, if you use some screws and plug the holes later on.
    S_M
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: 10" wall installing exterior french doors

    Quote Originally Posted by Sombreuil_mongrel View Post
    Are your doors a unit that have the threshold built in? Then, you just need something to "fill" the gap between the unit and the start of the existing floor. We have run into this several times. Like in masonry walls. The old brick or rockwork has to be made level. You could take some amount (like one course of brick or some quantity of stone) out of the way, and pour a concrete base (tiler's "dry pack" floor mud is great!) and set PT sleepers into this bed while wet to later take an extension of flooring. If you overlay the new mortar bed with some ice & water shield membrane, you can actually lay the flooring the next day when it's set up, if you used dry-pack, which as the name implies is mixed with just a very small amount of water. Regular concrete wait until it's no longer green-looking. Another thought is to lower it by another 3/4" and set plywood subfloor beneath, then finish flooring; kinda depends on what the flooring is, whether a subfloor is absolutely called for. Subfloor in strips can be run underneath the old floor in the joist bays to tie things together, if you use some screws and plug the holes later on.
    S_M
    *** thanks you for the information . Yes it is a unit with metal threshold. Will implement you suggestions. Have a great summer.

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