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Thread: Split Tree

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default Split Tree

    I have a tree (can't remember the name - helicopter seeds ) that is split. It's only about 2 years old. The trunk is about 2 feet tall and then it has 2 limbs that separate and go up another 10 feet or so. It's a weak tree, so the storm we had today pulled the limbs until the trunk split about 2 or 3 inches. Does anyone think there's a way to keep it, or should I cut it down? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Split Tree

    Sounds like some kind of maple tree, judging by the seeds. I'm not an expert, but my dad was a real tree lover (forestry major at UMass/Amherst). So, I hate seeing any tree get dumped. Still, a split is serious, and will only get worse as the tree grows. You probably could save it by putting that tar-like stuff on it that they use after pruning, but with bare wood, it's a gamble. Then, a cable between the 2 branches might work. Still, you'd have to keep adjusting it and probably replacing it as it grows. Since it's small, maybe it's best to say good-bye and give it a good burial...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Split Tree

    This will be necessary to keep it from splitting further and to allow the tree to heal over the wound. If the bark was separated all the way around the trunk of the tree the tree is more than likely dead above this split.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwet
    Posts
    1,643

    Default Re: Split Tree

    If it's a small tree, you will probably be better off replacing it. You could try to repair it, but chances are it will never be a healthy or strong tree.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Split Tree

    A split in phylogenetics is a bipartition of a set of taxa, and the smallest unit of information in unrooted phylogenetic trees: each edge of an unrooted phylogenetic tree represents one split, and the tree can be efficiently reconstructed from its set of splits. Moreover, when given several trees, the splits occurring in more than half of these trees give rise to a consensus tree, and the splits occurring in a smaller fraction of the trees generally give rise to a consensus Split Network.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Split Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by Sidney Fife View Post
    Sounds like some kind of maple tree, judging by the seeds. I'm not an expert, but my dad was a real tree lover (forestry major at UMass/Amherst). So, I hate seeing any tree get dumped. Still, a split is serious, and will only get worse as the tree grows. You probably could save it by putting that tar-like stuff on it that they use after pruning, but with bare wood, it's a gamble. Then, a cable between the 2 branches might work. Still, you'd have to keep adjusting it and probably replacing it as it grows. Since it's small, maybe it's best to say good-bye and give it a good burial...
    Its hard to know without seeing but I think its worth trying to save. At the home and garden stores they make rubber surrounded wire that will hold the tree together while it heals and you will need to seal it with the tar substance to it doesn't rot.

    The other option is hitting your local nursery supply or greenhouse and asking them. If they say its a loosing battle, at least you can pick up a new tree while you are there
    Hidden Content weather resistant for out door nursery supply conditions, receptive to pen, pencil and markers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: Split Tree

    If the weak tree is near the house or other structure, may want to write it off and avoid damage later. Otherwise, pulling the tree together may be possible, could even consider drilling and placing small bolt through with washers on both sides that could later be grown over if it survives. Wrapping almost a must for the immediate future until bark starts healing over.

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